Newhouse Sports Media Center

Student Reporting Archive

’15 Alum, Former NFL Player Cameron Lynch Joins Fall Speaker Series

October 21, 2020

2015 alum and former NFL player Cameron Lynch joined the Newhouse Fall speaker series on Tuesday night. The event was hosted by Newhouse professor Brad Horn.   Lynch earned a bachelor’s degree in economics before making it to the NFL as an undrafted free agent – beating the odds of 1% of players making an NFL […]

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2015 alum and former NFL player Cameron Lynch joined the Newhouse Fall speaker series on Tuesday night. The event was hosted by Newhouse professor Brad Horn.  

Lynch earned a bachelor’s degree in economics before making it to the NFL as an undrafted free agent – beating the odds of 1% of players making an NFL roster as undrafted free agents. Lynch played for both the Los Angeles Rams and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.  

A dynamic individual, along with being named the Bucs community MVP multiple weeks – an award that recognizes NFL players who are making a positive impact in their local communities — Lynch was able to take advantage of camera opportunities with the NFL Network, Fox Sports and was even selected as one of four players to broadcast this past year’s Superbowl. That same year, he was named the interim co-host on a daytime show for NBC.  

Bring Your Full Self  

One of the takeaways Lynch gave to students was his definition of success, which he considers as, “what you leave behind for people.”  

He recalled a story of his experience as a student-athlete at Syracuse. A lot of early mornings he and his teammates would be in the gym training and often, there was a lady who would be cleaning the facilities. Lynch would open the door for her every morning and make friendly conversation, often showing his appreciation for her hard work. However, there was an issue Lynch had with the cleaning lady — the lady would wear a Boston College shirt. Lynch was confused why she would support an ACC rival. He never brought it up and continued to show graciousness to the employee.  

The cleaning lady would turn out to be the mother of one of Lynch’s mentors when he got to the NFL, who, ironically enough, played for Boston College.  

“Treating people well, being authentic I think can be the most important thing,” Lynch said. “It propelled me to that next level within the NFL.”  

Lynch attributes “bringing his full self” to what led him to where he is today and granted him many of the opportunities he is grateful for, including the opportunity to be able to speak with Newhouse students.  

Media Opportunities 

Lynch’s media career started his senior year at Syracuse when he had a show called “Cam’s Cam,” which he jokingly said, “wasn’t it,” when talking about Newhouse standards of production.  

Lynch would produce his show by interviewing his teammates after practice which allowed him to discover that he enjoyed telling the untold stories that people usually do not hear or see. He attributes his time at Syracuse to being where he fell in love with media.  

Regardless of the quality of his show, Lynch said it helped him figure out what he liked and did not like – a very important aspect to know about certain industries and careers.  

Lynch took this passion of storytelling and used his platform of being a professional athlete to incorporate himself in his local community. He would go on radio stations after practice and on off days when he was in the NFL to tell the stories of the local community.  

An economics major, Lynch was able to learn about the sports media industry by simply putting out content, which he encourages students to do as well.  

“Just do it,” Lynch told students. “Just put something out there, see what happens and it will get better as you go.”  

Arda Ocal Talks Esports at Speaker Series

October 1, 2020

By Dominick Pfisterer ESPN Sports and Esports host and commentator Arda Ocal joined the Newhouse Sports Media Center fall speaker series on Wednesday night. The event was hosted by Sports Media Center Director and Newhouse Professor Olivia Stomski.   Ocal was an on-air personality for the WWE under the name Kyle Edwards, as well as the host of Aftermath TV […]

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By Dominick Pfisterer

ESPN Sports and Esports host and commentator Arda Ocal joined the Newhouse Sports Media Center fall speaker series on Wednesday night. The event was hosted by Sports Media Center Director and Newhouse Professor Olivia Stomski.  

Ocal was an on-air personality for the WWE under the name Kyle Edwards, as well as the host of Aftermath TV on Sportsnet 360 and The MSG Hockey Show on MSG Network. He previously was an analyst for Rogers TV and a host for YES Network.  

Ocal had a passion for sports and dreamt of a career in the industry. As a mathematics major when he was in college, the opportunities did not present themselves right away.  

“I worked a desk job for several years after I graduated college,” Ocal said. “I was a product manager at Dun and Bradstreet for a few years and honestly when I was doing that the itch wasn’t gone.”  

Despite not being integrated into the sports media industry through his college years, Ocal found a way to get acclimated and develop his broadcasting skillset in alternative methods.  

He attributes “catching the bug” for wanting to work in sports broadcasting to working at his college’s radio station and newspaper. However, to learn about the different departments, he plugged himself in firsthand.  

“Nights and weekends, I didn’t party,” he said. “I went to the local access channel because YouTube wasn’t a thing back then and I just learned every department.”  

His introduction to this new field came late, as he was 27, which he considers his “only regret”.  

Esports 

Ocal gave an in-depth look at the world of Esports to the students. A growing segment of the industry, Esports is providing jobs and platforms for the wide variety of people who aspire to be play by play announcers and color commentators. Ocal got his Esports start in 2016, when ESPN sent him to the League of Legends World Championship at Madison Square Garden.  

“I got hooked the second I went there,” Ocal said about his experience. “MSG, the world’s most famous arena was sold out both nights for kids playing video games. It was the greatest thing ever.”  

That experience in 2016 was the driving force to Ocal’s career in Esports. He then became a student of the industry, learning everything he could and doing his homework about the different games and the different scenes.  

According to Ocal, there is a different element to announcing Esports than there is to a traditional broadcast. One of the biggest differences is the pace in which the announcers speak. Ocala said that Esports announcers, “pride themselves at the speed of which they talk,” and referred to them as “Rap God’s” for the way they can speak so fast yet not fumble over their words.  

“Joe Buck doing commentary at the Super Bowl is the exact opposite of someone calling League of Legends or Overwatch,” he said. “This is the most frantic thing ever and they take pride over not fumbling over their words.”  

The energy of an Esports championship broadcast, Ocal said, is something the fans want “tapped into their veins.” 

No matter what sport an announcer is calling, no matter the familiarity with the sport the announcer has, Ocal has a simple principle that preparation will give any announcer the confidence to succeed.  

“Every extra hour of preparation you put in will bring you closer to that level of confidence,” he said. “At some point after you have learned as much as you can learn, it’s all about confidence. Knowledge is power, but also, knowledge is confidence. That’s the key there.”  

Eric Salat, ‘06 Alum Eric Weiner Talk Documentary, Podcasting

October 1, 2020

By Dominick Pfisterer Producer Eric Salat and ‘06 alum Eric Weiner joined the Sports Media Center fall speaker series on Wednesday, hosted by Sports Media Center Director Professor Olivia Stomski.   Weiner’s work spans scripted and unscripted TV, food, sports journalism, and most recently, podcasts. He has worked on 100+ hours of television for Discovery Channel, National Geographic, […]

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By Dominick Pfisterer

Producer Eric Salat and ‘06 alum Eric Weiner joined the Sports Media Center fall speaker series on Wednesday, hosted by Sports Media Center Director Professor Olivia Stomski.  

Weiner’s work spans scripted and unscripted TV, food, sports journalism, and most recently, podcasts. He has worked on 100+ hours of television for Discovery Channel, National Geographic, YouTube Premium, Comedy Central, and more, and has developed projects with various production companies, such as Entertainment One, Funny or Die, Matthew Baer Films, Irwin Entertainment, and Karga 7 Pictures.  

The two produced “DRAFTED”, a documentary following eight of the top college football players that were in this past year’s NFL draft. Among the names were Jeff Okudah (Lions) Chase Young (Washington Football Team) and Mekhi Becton (Jets).  

The documentary is an audio documentary. There is no visual footage, giving it a raw, honest feel that is not commonly found when working with cameras. 

Audio Storytelling 

“A ton,” was Weiner’s response to how much work goes into the overall writing and putting the pieces together to tell the stories of these athletes in an audio-based format.  

What separates this audio documentary from more traditional documentaries, other than the audio format, are the themes that arise through the storytelling, rather than a linear perspective of an individual’s life.  

“One of the most interesting things was when we were digging into it, we started to see some of these themes,” Weiner said. “Certain guys have had to overcome obstacles again and again in their life and when we would bring it up, they were unaware of these things that kept reoccurring in their own life. When we would bring that up it would be a revelation to them and then they would be more open to talk about it.”  

The themes helped direct the storytelling of the amazing stories that are the lives of these athletes.  

Weiner and Salat emphasized that there is an authenticity to audio storytelling that differs from television. The key to this, they said, was to “let their thoughts flow” when referring to the interview subjects, rather than “keep it tight.”  

“It made it feel more authentic and real,” Weiner said. “It allowed us to take a step back and realize that this was much better than tightening and tightening and tightening.”  

Podcasting  

DRAFTED” is in a podcast format, broken up into several episodes. Podcasts are rapidly growing in their popularity due to the convenience that they can be accessed and the smooth, conversational flow that they are delivered in. While podcasts are easy to enjoy, they come with a few challenges opposed to visual storytelling, such as setting the scene.   

Podcasters cannot rely on a variety of shots to “set the scene,” according to Salat. Podcasts rely more on sounds to set their scenes, such as music, dialogue or even silence to get into the “narrative flow.” 

This requires a more intricate form of writing for the producers.  

“It’s more rhythmic,” said Salat. “It is the writing into the actuality, the writing into a specific sound up, I appreciate the rhythms of the writing.”  

To create a visual story using nothing besides sounds and audio, Weiner had a unique method of exercise for students. 

“Listen to a T.V. channel,” Weiner said. “Don’t watch it. Go into a separate room and just listen to it.”  

“DRAFTED” can be streamed on iHeartRadio and Apple Podcasts.  

’01 Andrew Catalon talks the start of NFL

September 30, 2020

Story: Dominick Pfisterer CBS play-by-play announcer and ‘01 alum Andrew Catalon joined the Newhouse Sports Media center fall speaker series on Wednesday night. The event was hosted by the voice of Syracuse athletics and Newhouse Professor Matt Park.  Catalon did not have the dream path that everyone imagines a CBS play-by-play announcer from Newhouse would […]

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Story: Dominick Pfisterer

CBS play-by-play announcer and ‘01 alum Andrew Catalon joined the Newhouse Sports Media center fall speaker series on Wednesday night. The event was hosted by the voice of Syracuse athletics and Newhouse Professor Matt Park. 

Catalon did not have the dream path that everyone imagines a CBS play-by-play announcer from Newhouse would have. The path is not always get into Newhouse, work hard for four years and then make it big. 

For Catalon, he did not even begin his path at Newhouse. 

“I did not get into Newhouse right off the bat,” said Catalon. “I had to go through the School of Visual and Performing Arts. I was a Speech Communication major and transferred in after my freshman year.” 

That did not stop Catalon from getting to where he is today. He had a goal in mind and when he eventually did get into Newhouse, he took advantage of the excellent opportunities Newhouse has to offer to help him become the tremendous play-by-play announcer he is today. 

“WAER was instrumental but the entire program as we know is top notch,” said Catalon. “Those types of experiences were massive in my growth at Newhouse and at Syracuse.” 

 Before becoming the sports director at the Albany NBC affiliate, Catalon found himself in Burlington, Vermont as a local news sports anchor. He showed up to the job two weeks after graduation without even looking at where he would be spending his days post-Newhouse. 

He spent a few years there until eventually, the station shut down. 

“They ran out of money and said, ‘we’re better off running The Simpsons at six o’clock than the local news,’” said Catalon. 

After being in the local news industry for several years, Catalon found himself going back to his true passion of calling play-by-play. 

One of Catalon’s biggest messages to students who attended the event was that there is no direct path, no “cookie cutter” formula that leads to becoming a play-by-play announcer on a major network. People who want to become play-by-play announcers would not follow in the same exact path as Andrew Catalon. While he commented on how his path to play-by-play was unique, he did, however, stress that to be in that position, there needs to be somewhat of a “Yes-Man” mentality. 

“It is important to say yes to everything you can,” said Catalon. “There should be nothing that you say, that’s not for me or I do not know that sport or I cannot do that.” 

As a student at Newhouse, Catalon did internships covering a few baseball teams. However, he got connected to NBC and brought back into play-by-play after being in local news for several years through the sport of curling, which Catalon stated he, “knew nothing about.” 

That one word, that one “yes” brought him to many different opportunities and eventually, to CBS where he is today. He attributes the key to getting where he is today was by saying yes and understanding that one path might not be the exact right path, as Catalon would agree no such thing exists.

To make it in the industry, Catalon had very simple advice to students. 

“You have to be a nice person,” he said. “That goes a long way in this business, especially when you’re out on the road with camera crews and technical crews and hundreds of people to put an event on. They remember who is not nice to them they remember who is high maintenance.” 

As simple it is, Catalon stressed the importance of simply being a nice person and treating colleagues with respect. This helps build relationships and strengthen professionalism. 

With the adjustments made during the COVID-19 global pandemic, a lot of production meetings are held over Zoom. This has stressed the importance of the relationships that Catalon has built face-to-face. 

“Obviously our production meetings are a lot different this year. We’re not going to practice we’re not sitting at a conference table we are doing it like this on Zoom, which makes it even more important that I’ve had these previous relationships.” 

This weekend, Catalon is calling the Vikings-Titans game on Sunday afternoon. 

’92 Johanna Garton Kicks off Speaker Series

September 19, 2020

By Dominick Pfisterer The Newhouse Sports Media Center kicked off its Fall 2020 speaker series with ’92 alum and author Johanna Garton. The event was hosted by the Newhouse Sports Media Center director and Syracuse University professor Olivia Stomski.   A member of the cross country and track teams at Syracuse, Garton attributes her experiences […]

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By Dominick Pfisterer

The Newhouse Sports Media Center kicked off its Fall 2020 speaker series with ’92 alum and author Johanna Garton.

The event was hosted by the Newhouse Sports Media Center director and Syracuse University professor Olivia Stomski.  

A member of the cross country and track teams at Syracuse, Garton attributes her experiences as an athlete to shaping her Syracuse experience as well as being on the sports desk of the radio station Z-89. 

“Those were the two main things that I focused on in college, running and the radio station,” Garton said. 

Her background as an athlete helped direct her into the sports journalism profession. Garton recalled thinking she would be a “regular old newspaper broadcast journalism person,” but the pairing of being an athlete and journalism allowed her to naturally gravitate towards sports journalism over the years. 

Tranformative

Being a freshman presents naturally challenges. For most, it is the first time being away from home and having to make new friends. Garton had to deal with what she referred to as a “transformative experience” her freshman year at Syracuse. That being the December 21, 1988 Pan Am Flight 103 that exploded over Lockerbie, Scotland carrying 35 Syracuse University students. 

This changed Garton’s world. She had never thought about going to study abroad, but she decided that day that she would study abroad through one of Syracuse’s overseas programs. 

“I wanted to walk in their footsteps and see what they had discovered in the world,”Garton said.  

 It was her junior year she found herself studying abroad in France. It was then she was bitten by the “wanderlust” travel bug that she still has today. It was this bug that led her to turn down her first job offer after graduation – a position with The Los Angeles Times — to move to Asia. 

“This kind of set me off in a long, circular path,” said Garton. “To law school and consulting and teaching college to getting married and having children, and eventually moving back overseas with my two young children and my husband a few years ago.” 

Edge of the Map

She acknowledges these experiences as what led to the publication of her first book, “Awakening East,” and eventually he most recent book, “Edge of the Map” which got her back into sports reporting. 

“Edge of the Map” is based on the life of high-altitude mountaineer Christine Boskoff, who was killed with her climbing partner in 2006 in western China. 

“When I learned about her story many years ago, I really felt like it was a story that needed to be told,” Garton said. 

Boskoff did not want to be recognized for her gender, but for her accomplishments. She does hold the record for hiking 6 of the 14 8,000 meter peaks in the world, a record she set in 2000. 

For readers of “Edge of the Map,” Garton hopes that they find internal inspiration through the story of Christina Boskoff. 

“I hope people come away with an understanding to look within themselves to find those things that inspire them. To try not to listen to the noise or pay attention to what other people are doing or saying or everybody else’s path because your path is going to look very different from the next person.” 

Garton’s own biggest takeaway from her journey in writing her book was to “pay attention more to what is going on inside of me.” 

Students interested in reading Garton’s “Edge of the Map” can find it in paperback, audio and E-book versions. 

The Newhouse Sports Media Center speaker series serves to connect students with alumni and industry professionals. 

Morgan Alexander – What Comes Next

May 5, 2020

Story and Photo by Veer Badani SYRACUSE, N.Y. – Morgan Alexander is a Newhouse graduate student, now into her fifth year on the Syracuse University women’s lacrosse team. She clutches Drew Brees’ memoir titled, ‘Coming Back Stronger: Unleashing the Hidden Power of Adversity.’ One of Brees’ most famous quotes says, “Anyone can see the adversity […]

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Story and Photo by Veer Badani

SYRACUSE, N.Y. – Morgan Alexander is a Newhouse graduate student, now into her fifth year on the Syracuse University women’s lacrosse team. She clutches Drew Brees’ memoir titled, ‘Coming Back Stronger: Unleashing the Hidden Power of Adversity.’

One of Brees’ most famous quotes says, “Anyone can see the adversity in a difficult situation, but it takes a stronger person to see the opportunity.”

These words come from a man who knows a thing or two about sports and how to overcome injuries caused by the same.

To Alexander, the book makes a lot of sense when a person glances beyond the book in her hands. After tearing her ACL, her lacrosse season abruptly ended – forcing her out with the long-term injury. However, her outlook on the situation is one that could have come straight from the pages of Brees’ himself.

“I’m blessed,” said Alexander, after watching her team practice. “I have great coaches, great teammates, great parents, great friends, great everything and for every non-blessing like this ACL I have four or five blessings to count as well.”

Her current injury joins a list of previous injuries that kept Alexander out of the game she loves for considerable periods of time. Now, she has a decision to make: return to the team for a sixth year, or end her college playing career atop this injury.

“I’m not done, I don’t have to be done if I don’t want to be,” Alexander said. “I am going to rehab this and be fine.”

Her focus now shifts to rehab, but like her idol Drew Brees, Alexander aims to be a leader on and off the pitch – injured or not. Her new goal is to take on a new role.

“I just need to be a leader,” Alexander said. “It’s one thing to be a leader when everything is going your way, but it’s hard when people are playing and you are not getting to. I just need to be there for my teammates and try to help them get better.”

Team dynamics can be tricky to navigate and finding your place in the team can take years for some, but for others it’s just a matter of being there.

“Whether you are the first one off the bench, a starter, or you don’t play you are still all in,” she said.

While this is her first ever torn ACL injury, Alexander has suffered several knee-related injuries in the past over her playing career at Syracuse University and her teammates have suffered with her all along the way.

“The number one word is heartbreaking,” Alexander said. “It’s a little different this time because I rehabbed really hard and came back a better player than I think I was before which is almost unheard of. I played the first four games and in one split moment you feel like you got everything ripped out of you. My teammates were in shock but they were so supportive and I couldn’t ask for a better support system than I have with this team.”

Alexander is also fortunate to be able to call on her degree at Newhouse as a backup plan if lacrosse doesn’t work out the way she wants.

“I talked with my Professor at Newhouse about this,” Alexander said. “He told me that Newhouse isn’t a backup plan, for most people it is the plan so to have that as your major, which is in itself hard to do, so I am extremely blessed.”

As for the future, a sixth year seems imminent at the moment, but Alexander has more than just one skill up her sleeve.

“I want to be a sports broadcaster or sideline reporter and I think I would be good at that,” Alexander said. “I hope that everything I have gone through can translate into broadcasting and I can become a sideline reporter in the future, that is my goal.”

Sports Media Center Closes Out Speaker Series

May 5, 2020

Story by Kyla Wright, Screenshots via ZOOM As the Newhouse Sports Media Center Speaker series and entire semester came to a close, students digested a wealth of knowledge from both ends of the sports media industry. Students, alumni and faculty heard from author and WSJ sports reporter Jared Diamond ’10, CBS Sports’ Adam Schein ’99, […]

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Story by Kyla Wright, Screenshots via ZOOM

As the Newhouse Sports Media Center Speaker series and entire semester came to a close, students digested a wealth of knowledge from both ends of the sports media industry. Students, alumni and faculty heard from author and WSJ sports reporter Jared Diamond ’10, CBS Sports’ Adam Schein ’99, and two panels: one of recent Newhouse grads in the sports industry and one of ESPN professionals.

Diamond, as many other sports journalists discovered his passion for writing and discussing sports in recognition that he couldn’t play, saying that he, “caught the bug early.” From making sports newsletters in elementary school to being the sports editor of his high school paper, he found himself at SU at WAER and the Daily Orange.

Jack Patel ’18, recognized the benefit of being a Newhouse alum, but understood he still is working his way through the industry. “You are starting at the bottom. My first week at ESPN, I wasn’t allowed to cut any [videos] on my own,” said Patel. “It’s frustrating, coming out of Syracuse with all of your skills and responsibilities, you have to be patient.”

As Diamond, Patel, and other alumni learned early to “say yes to everything,” they credit the Newhouse name and experiences for preparing them for the industry.

“I took my classes seriously, my work seriously, my prep seriously, that came from Newhouse and Syracuse University,” said Schein.

Less than two years post-grad, the members on the Young Alumni panel are still learning the industry and making connections all while navigating their careers amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Erin Fish, G’18, stressed getting out of your comfort zone being the “best way to push you forward in your career.” Drew Carter ’19, has learned that even while he’s learning, those around him are, as well. “I am taken aback by how advanced things are at Newhouse compared to the real world,” said Carter. “When I was a student and things would go wrong, I would get angry; but I have realized that those mistakes happen a lot in the real world.”

Both Dakota Palmer G’19, and Carter are working to better themselves amid Coronavirus-related layoffs. Palmer, a broadcast associate at MLB, has been watching games, paying attention to what other producers have done as far as cuts, edits and styles. Carter has said that he’s going to be calling games on 2K with a friend to stay sharp, as if he’s on radio. Nate White ’18, is preparing for the post-Coronavirus sports industry. “Instead of being angry and feeling bad about this situation, which is easy to do, I am trying to focus on what I can do,” said White. “[I’m] using this time to get organized and be ready for when sports come back and the ‘boom’ happens.”

Even though ESPN’s Kirk Herbstreit didn’t attend ‘Cuse, he expressed his longtime respect for the Orange, especially Newhouse as he’s worked with many Newhouse alumni in his career. “Syracuse has got to be the strongest school in the industry, so if you are a student there, congratulations.”

ESPN’s Bill Bonnell ’85, and Jim Gaiero ’95 both gave students direct advice and points to remember in their careers. Bonnell noted the importance of being able to produce, direct and tell stories on the fly, and Gaiero reminded students that we’re all journalists at heart, “no matter what role what you do in sports television, you still need to answer the questions, who, what where, why when. It doesn’t matter who you are, you effect how the audience gets those answers.”

Herbstreit went on to recommend that students “study people you respect,” especially those interested in play-by-play, “there is nobody better than Mike Tirico.”

Closing out the year, Herbstreit likely has the words that graduates, continuing students and professionals alike need to hear, “you are going to have forks in the road along the way and you have no idea what the right answer is. As a business major, I had economic stability versus my passion,” said Herbstreit. “Always follow your heart, following money will always be a dead-end. Find something you have passion for, and you’ll never work a day in your life.”

Sports Industry Speakers Join Weeks Two and Three

April 20, 2020

As the second and third weeks of the Newhouse Sports Media Center’s Online Speaker Series came to a close, students, alumni, faculty and staff gained knowledge, advice and motivation to hopefully fuel them into their present or future careers. Speakers ranged from an NFL play-by-play announcer to VPs of an agency and PR firm and […]

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As the second and third weeks of the Newhouse Sports Media Center’s Online Speaker Series came to a close, students, alumni, faculty and staff gained knowledge, advice and motivation to hopefully fuel them into their present or future careers. Speakers ranged from an NFL play-by-play announcer to VPs of an agency and PR firm and a CBS Sports Analyst. Each event had approximately 40 students in attendance.

NFL play-by-play announcer, Andrew Siciliano ’96 recalled industry speakers during his time at Newhouse. “We had people like Bob Costas and Mike Tirico who’d do stuff like this for us when we were in school.” He noted those alumni taking their time to speak with him and other students as one of many reasons why he always makes time for students. “Everyone paid it forward when we were in school. So we’re just trying to do the same,” said Siciliano.

Alumni and students alike, everyone is home in front of some type of screen for hours at a time. Students are managing classes and alumni are continuing their careers, alumni like Gideon Cohen ’00, recommended that students, “develop a new skill, create a podcast or YouTube show,” he said. “This is temporary. While it’s not great at the moment, it’s an opportunity.”

Siciliano remains on air by doing top of the hour news updates and Total Hour Access in a second bedroom and a camera at home, along with a host of producers working from home. “We’re experimenting to be going on air, but right now 30-minute shows are taped segment to segment with producers linking b-roll and graphics to them,” Siciliano said. He explained that CNN or FOX stays on-air by running parallel control rooms, doing things you’d normally have in one room in multiple, but the NFL is shut down because they’re not considered essential.

Scott Pioli G’05, is a CBS Sports Analyst, five-time NFL Executive of the year and three-time Super Bowl champion. Throughout his lengthy career, he’s had to find a happy medium between work and family, a question commonly asked by students. “You are going to be very passionate and your job needs to be taken seriously but if I could do anything differently, I would have a better balance and realize that there will be things in life much more important than our jobs,” Pioli said. He told students to maintain a similar balance in their careers as they do while in college, but regardless of the situation, to remain focused. “There’s always going to be reasons to not finish something you started. A job, school, or relationship, said Pioli. “There are a lot of reasons to say no or stop but if you want to complete something, it’ll essentially pay off.” Cohen gave similar advice, noting those who work hard and encompass talent are the ones who “make it” in the media industry. “A lot of people give up or don’t necessarily want to play the game,” said Cohen. “They don’t want to self-improve or network, and a lot of [those] people who don’t advance wonder why it’s not happening for them.”

Dave Donovan ’92, Executive VP and Director of Sports for DKC, a PR firm had an intimate, off-the-record conversation with students.

With varied experiences at Newhouse and Syracuse overall, all speakers agreed that the time spent and connections made as an Orange are still paying off. As Cohen paid homage to Sandy Montag as “the OG of the agency business,” he noted that they only talk about SU alums at The Montag Group. Siciliano said, “the Syracuse degree is powerful, but the Syracuse network is more powerful.” Pioli values the legacy he leaves behind for the family he’s created, and the #NewhouseMafia. “Right now, you are not thinking about legacy, but your legacy really is about how many people you help,” said Pioli.

If students didn’t take away anything from the week’s series, Pioli’s words could resonate with them, especially during times of uncertainty. “All of us, even the best of us end up in the middle. You have good days and you have bad days but as long as you stay on track, you’ll end up on top.”As the second week of the Newhouse Sports Media Center’s Online Speaker Series came to a close, students gain knowledge, advice and motivation to hopefully fuel them into their future sports careers. Speakers ranged from an NFL play-by-play announcer to VPs of an agency and PR firm and a CBS Sports Analyst. Each event had approximately 40 students in attendance.

NFL play-by-play announcer, Andrew Siciliano ’96 recalled industry speakers during his time at Newhouse. “We had people like Bob Costas and Mike Tirico who’d do stuff like this for us when we were in school.” He noted those alumni taking their time to speak with him and other students as one of many reasons why he always makes time for students. “Everyone paid it forward when we were in school. So we’re just trying to do the same,” said Siciliano.

Alumni and students alike, everyone is home in front of some type of screen for hours at a time. Students are managing classes and alumni are continuing their careers, alumni like Gideon Cohen ’00, recommended that students, “develop a new skill, create a podcast or YouTube show,” he said. “This is temporary. While it’s not great at the moment, it’s an opportunity.”

Siciliano remains on air by doing top of the hour news updates and Total Hour Access in a second bedroom and a camera at home, along with a host of producers working from home. “We’re experimenting to be going on air, but right now 30-minute shows are taped segment to segment with producers linking b-roll and graphics to them,” Siciliano said. He explained that CNN or FOX stays on-air by running parallel control rooms, doing things you’d normally have in one room in multiple, but the NFL is shut down because they’re not considered essential.

Scott Pioli G’05, is a CBS Sports Analyst, five-time NFL Executive of the year and three-time Super Bowl champion. Throughout his lengthy career, he’s had to find a happy medium between work and family, a question commonly asked by students. “You are going to be very passionate and your job needs to be taken seriously but if I could do anything differently, I would have a better balance and realize that there will be things in life much more important than our jobs,” Pioli said. He told students to maintain a similar balance in their careers as they do while in college, but regardless of the situation, to remain focused. “There’s always going to be reasons to not finish something you started. A job, school, or relationship, said Pioli. “There are a lot of reasons to say no or stop but if you want to complete something, it’ll essentially pay off.” Cohen gave similar advice, noting those who work hard and encompass talent are the ones who “make it” in the media industry. “A lot of people give up or don’t necessarily want to play the game,” said Cohen. “They don’t want to self-improve or network, and a lot of [those] people who don’t advance wonder why it’s not happening for them.”

Dave Donovan ’92, Executive VP and Director of Sports for DKC, a PR firm had an intimate, off-the-record conversation with students.

With varied experiences at Newhouse and Syracuse overall, all speakers agreed that the time spent and connections made as an Orange are still paying off. As Cohen paid homage to Sandy Montag as “the OG of the agency business,” he noted that they only talk about SU alums at The Montag Group. Siciliano said, “the Syracuse degree is powerful, but the Syracuse network is more powerful.” Pioli values the legacy he leaves behind for the family he’s created, and the #NewhouseMafia. “Right now, you are not thinking about legacy, but your legacy really is about how many people you help,” said Pioli.

If participants didn’t take away anything from the weeks’ series, Pioli’s words could resonate with them, especially during times of uncertainty. “All of us, even the best of us end up in the middle. You have good days and you have bad days but as long as you stay on track, you’ll end up on top.”

Ian Eagle and Mike Tirico Meet with Students, Virtually

April 6, 2020

As students are away from campus and likely quarantined in their respective locations, academic programs have navigated to online means to stay in contact. To uphold the Sports Media and Communications Track’s requirements, and connect students with industry professionals, the Newhouse Sports Media Center hosted two events, via Zoom. Hosted by “Voice of the Orange,” […]

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As students are away from campus and likely quarantined in their respective locations, academic programs have navigated to online means to stay in contact. To uphold the Sports Media and Communications Track’s requirements, and connect students with industry professionals, the Newhouse Sports Media Center hosted two events, via Zoom. Hosted by “Voice of the Orange,” Matt Park, hundreds of students logged onto the online platform to virtually meet with Ian Eagle and Mike Tirico, both Newhouse alumni.

Both Eagle and Tirico discussed their journey through Newhouse, the ups and downs of their careers, journalism in the age of the Coronavirus and advice on perfecting their craft and circumnavigating the job industry at present time.

“Even though I graduated 30 years ago, I still have the same mentality. I’m still a student of the profession,” said Eagle. “You have to be critical and comfortable with hearing and watching yourself. Watching others, listening with a critical ear and watching with a critical eye.” Eagle recalled metaphorically being a “sponge” while a student, and even now. While driving to and from Queens and Syracuse he would listen to play-by-play announcers back and forth, just to “get it in” his head. As a current CBS and Brooklyn News play-by-play broadcaster, Eagle noted dedication and curiosity along with connections for landing him to where he is today.

Invested in bettering himself as a sports broadcaster, Eagle ensured that no matter the opportunity presented to him, he said his answer and his mentality was always, “yes.” The desire to know more is one of the monumental factors in elevating him in his career. “There were times I wasn’t qualified to do what I did, but I was confident, and I was prepared,” Eagle said. “Make sure you’re locked in – you’re all in – zero in on what you’re passionate about and what’s going to get you excited to wake up. What’s going to challenge you?”

Finding a challenge amid his passion, Eagle reminisced on once receiving a call, asking if he did boxing play-by-play, he said yes. Even though he didn’t; he laughed, recalling he’d never been to a fight or even been in one, but he refused to pass up an opportunity to learn something new and advance his skillset. The same with situation occurred with track and field, and with no background he watched about 20 hours of coverage to prepare. He ensured that he got himself familiar with pacing, nomenclature, and athletes of the sports, and no one would’ve known he was formerly unfamiliar, unless he told them. As he gain a newfound knowledge of the sports, he gained a love for them as well.

Students often hear about the importance of connections within the media industry, usually followed by the saying, “it’s not what you know, but who you know.” Eagle planted a similar seed, telling students to make connections with classmates now, as you never know who you’re in school with, as the same happened to him.

“I didn’t realize that Mike Tirico was Mike Tirico. He became a very close friend, and that hatched at Syracuse because we were two people that had aspirations to do more and achieve more,” said Eagle.

When Tirico spoke to students a few days later, he was in his makeshift studio comprised of his iPad and a mic after being in quarantine in Florida since a March 11 PGA tournament. Instead of moping about the current pandemic, he challenged students to make it a part of their resiliency.

“Think about it like sports: this is apart of your story,” Tirico said. “Don’t dwell or get yourself lost in the self-pity of it, make the best of the situation and thrive.”

He recommended that students make the best of their situations, whether at home, or in their apartments as the COVID-19 outbreak will change the journalism industry, as far as remote work. He told students to still practice being on camera and editing video by recording 30 second updates on sports or news events on their phones, editing with simple materials and software. The NBC Sports play-by-play broadcaster advised that this is an imperative time for students to highlight their versatility. As there are no sports right now, many sportscasters are doing news. When you see a non-news reporter attempting to do such, and they don’t know what they’re talking about, it’s obvious, Tirico said.

This weekend, Tirico celebrated 33 years since he first appeared on camera, and attributes it to continually bettering himself and being a part of the well-known, “Newhouse Mafia.” He advised that students do the same during the world’s difficult times, and ended giving students the same advice he began with, “Do your best to be better everyday. Syracuse has been through some tough stuff in the past and we can come through this, and it’s because of you,” said Tirico. “Be ready to make this apart of your Syracuse story.”

Seen taking notes, watching and listening attentively, students were satisfied with the Sports Media Center’s first week hosting sports professionals remotely.

“These times are super uncertain right now, and as a grad student I’ve had some anxiety just thinking about trying to find a job in this climate. But, both Tirico and Ian Eagle were so motivating,” said SMC student, Maria Trivelpiece. “I’m thankful that the SMC Zoom calls happened. It gives us a chance to stay connected and stay on top of our game during these times.”

Sports Media Center Transitions to Online Industry Speakers

March 30, 2020

Story by Kyla Wright SYRACUSE, N.Y. – Embedded into the Sports Media and Communications track for graduate students, are a variety of requirements. Students must take a certain number of sports-related courses, have one-on-one meetings with the Sports Media Center’s director, Olivia Stomski, and attend several events with industry speakers. As the university has transitioned […]

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Story by Kyla Wright

SYRACUSE, N.Y. – Embedded into the Sports Media and Communications track for graduate students, are a variety of requirements. Students must take a certain number of sports-related courses, have one-on-one meetings with the Sports Media Center’s director, Olivia Stomski, and attend several events with industry speakers.

As the university has transitioned to online, remote learning due to the Coronavirus pandemic, the requirements have done the same. The first online conversation between SMC students and sports industry professionals, many of whom are alumni, will be held tonight.

Tonight, at 6:15 p.m., CBS and Brooklyn News play-by-play broadcaster, ’19 Marty Glickman Award Winner and Newhouse ’90 alum, Ian Eagle ’90 will be hosted on Zoom by Newhouse professor and “Voice of the Orange,” Matt Park. 

“The Newhouse Sports Media Center has been looking for ways to reconnect the Sports Media & Communications students with each other, faculty, staff and alums,” said Stomski. “Many voiced their disappointment in missing the many speakers the Center had planned for the spring semester.” 

Gaining faithful attendees beyond the requirements, SMC students like Matt Geraci would anticipate the speakers coming to Newhouse, to give an inside look into the sports industry. His favorite part is seeing where former Newhouse students went after school, their accomplishments and openness. “They provide snapshots into the work that it takes to be successful in this field,” Geraci said. “To hear from people in a bunch of different positions offered some interesting paths and takeaways.”

Stomski said the decision to transition online came after alumni reached out and are looking to help students during this time.

As most universities around the globe are hosting classes and events such as seminars and career fairs on tools such as Zoom or Google Hangouts, students worry about reliability among technology. Luckily, Geraci has a positive outlook on digital learning.

“It’ll definitely have its challenges but I also think it can be used as an opportunity to creatively utilize the resources we have in place to communicate remotely and still gain insights from speakers who may work remotely in their careers anyway,” said Geraci. 

Stomski notes that this difficult time is a pivotal lesson for her students – in learning, flexibility and togetherness. 

“It’s important for us all to stay connected, engaged and excited about the sports media industry. We cannot watch live sports at this time, but we can talk about them!”

Second-half spark leads Syracuse past GA Tech to snap three-game losing skid

March 5, 2020

Story by Bailey Arredondo, Photo by Kris Wan Four starters for Syracuse scored in double digits and the Orange shoot 64 percent in the second half in a 79-72 bounce-back win over Georgia Tech on Saturday in the Carrier Dome. 52-34 was the score differential in the second half and impressed Syracuse head coach Jim […]

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Story by Bailey Arredondo, Photo by Kris Wan

Four starters for Syracuse scored in double digits and the Orange shoot 64 percent in the second half in a 79-72 bounce-back win over Georgia Tech on Saturday in the Carrier Dome.

52-34 was the score differential in the second half and impressed Syracuse head coach Jim Boeheim.

“One of the best second halves we have ever played…anywhere,” said Boeheim.

Leading into Saturday’s matchup, the Orange (14-13, 8-8 ACC) and Georgia Tech split their head-to-head series 6-6. In their first meeting this season on Dec. 7., Elijah Hughes was 10-for-15 from the field and 7-for-7 from the free throw line for a career-high 33 points, leading Syracuse to a 97-63 stomping.

On Saturday, Syracuse relied on a 20-point and 7 rebounds effort from Hughes and Marek Dolejaz’s 20 points, that included 12-12 from the free throw line.

“I love playing basketball and I get the crowd into it. That’s what you have to do in college is have fun with it,” said Hughes.

Georgia Tech (13-14, 7-9 ACC) came into Central New York with some aggression as junior forward Moses Wright came out the gates attacking the paint and scored 8 points on 4-4 shooting, to put the pressure on Syracuse 17-9 at the 12 minute mark in the first half.

Syracuse started 3-17 from the field and Hughes was the lone offensive spark with 10 points at the half.

The Orange went on a 10-2 run to open up the second half and cut the deficit, 37-40. Joe Girard III had the hot hand during the run and dropped 8 quick points that featured a turn-around baseline jumper.

“When the ball goes in the basket, the game is a lot easier,” said Boeheim. “At halftime, this was a really hard game to win and the players ignored what has happened and is happening.”

Wright might have found his sanctuary inside the Carrier Dome as he went on to drop a career-high of 33 points. Syracuse held Yellow Jacket leading scorer (16 PPG) Michael Devoe scoreless in the second half and 11 total points.

Both parties had 34 points in the paint, but it was the tempo of the Orange’s offense that gave them the edge. 21 fast break points and 12 assists as a team.

Buddy Boeheim finished with 13 points and Girard III added two from beyond the arc and 15 points of his own.

Fourth quarter emotions cost Syracuse’s final home game against Boston College

March 4, 2020

Story by Bailey Arredondo, Photos by Tanner Russ SYRACUSE, N.Y. – After three nearly identical quarters of basketball, the Syracuse women’s basketball team couldn’t fight off Boston College in the fourth quarter and came up short, 88-81, in the last sporting event at the Carrier Dome for the year on Sunday night. Tied at 64 […]

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Story by Bailey Arredondo, Photos by Tanner Russ

SYRACUSE, N.Y. – After three nearly identical quarters of basketball, the Syracuse women’s basketball team couldn’t fight off Boston College in the fourth quarter and came up short, 88-81, in the last sporting event at the Carrier Dome for the year on Sunday night.

Tied at 64 after three quarters, the rest of the game was up for grabs on senior night. Down the stretch as emotions were flying at 83-78, Syracuse head coach Quentin Hillsman received a technical foul after arguing a no-call. That gave Boston College two free-throws and possession – which put the nail in the coffin for the Orange (15-14, 9-9 ACC).

“I take full responsibility for this one,” said Hillsman. “Our kids fought hard and I was fighting them, but that’s on me at the end.”

Boston College (18-11, 11-7 ACC) came out firing on all cylinders and set the tone for Syracuse, connecting on three-straight 3-pointers on their first three possessions and grabbed an early 11-2 lead.

“I told them to calm down, relax and to play the game,” said Hillsman, on what he said to his team following the Eagles start.

The Orange started putting together their own offensive game plan with Kiara Lewis and Gabrielle Lewis leading the charge. Both had 18 points on the night and Lewis added 8 assists.

Kiara Lewis trying to fend off players from Boston College.

After starting 6-of-14 from beyond the arc in the first-half, Syracuse struggled to pick back up in the second half – finishing 9-of-25.  

Syracuse shot 47 percent from the field and dominated the paint, 42-30.

Boston College had five players score in double-digits but held senior Emma Guy to just seven points. Guy is No. 1 in the ACC in field goal percentage and has scored in double-digits 9 straight games coming into Sunday’s contest.

The difference was the pace from Boston College, scoring 31 fast break points to Syracuse’s 13.

“We knew it was going to be a tough game and they shot the ball well from 3.” said Cooper. “But you have to put it in the past now and look towards the ACC tournament.”

With that mindset, the Orange’s regular season comes to an end with hopes of making an NCAA tournament appearance. First – a smaller, yet important, round of games this week in ACC tournament play.

Syracuse will sit at the #8 seed and will play #9 Virginia. Exact day and time, TBD.

“Right now, everyone is 0-0 and coming in fresh,” said Hillsman on what’s next. “We have to go win some games and win the tournament.”

From Newhouse to the Airwaves: Jay Alter’s Journey

March 2, 2020

Story by Cole Johnson, Photo by Kyla Wright SYRACUSE, N.Y. – There’s no place like Newhouse. Simply stated, it’s the place where the dreams in the media industry come to life for hundreds of students each year. It’s not just individual talent and determination that gets these students to the top of company resume lists […]

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Story by Cole Johnson, Photo by Kyla Wright

SYRACUSE, N.Y. – There’s no place like Newhouse. Simply stated, it’s the place where the dreams in the media industry come to life for hundreds of students each year.

It’s not just individual talent and determination that gets these students to the top of company resume lists each year. It’s more than that – it takes relationships and assistance from professors and alumni.

On Friday, students had the opportunity to network with 2016 alum, Jay Alter, who almost gave up his dream after his freshman year.

The ESPN play-by-play personality came back to Syracuse to call a Men’s lacrosse game, and speak to students about his journey and his life as a broadcaster.

“My parents wanted me to be an accountant,” said Alter. “But I wanted something different. I came here with a twinkle in my eye, and I did everything I set out to do…I wouldn’t do a single thing differently.”

For Alter, it wasn’t easy as it would seem to simply set a goal and “go get it.” Similar to other students, there may be times when they don’t think this is the right path for them.

“I had a lot of doubt at the end of my freshman year going into sophomore year if this was going to be it for me. I was struggling to get cleared at student radio stations and back home my sister was battling Leukemia,” said Alter. “I just wanted to be home. My mind wasn’t in it.”

He said that he called his parents, wanting to take a semester off and listening to his parents’ earlier advice about going into accounting. Yet, his dad told him that he was being ridiculous. There was nothing he could do to help at home, only to fight and work hard in school –  making a life for himself.

“I channeled all of that fight and put it here, and that really turned a corner for me,” Alter added. “I wouldn’t be here in this room today, without that.”

As Alter sat in front current sports journalism students with Newhouse Sports Media Center Director, Olivia Stomski, it was clear that he had overcome many doubts to get to where he is now. He attributed passion to being his driving force.

“You can’t manufacture passion. Passion makes you work ten times harder, research more, communicate better. If you lack that, you’re never going to make it in this industry because it’s too competitive,” said Alter. “This is a game of inches, and every inch you give yourself is a chance that you have. When you give yourself that inch, passion gives you a foot.”

After graduating, Alter landed a position at News12 in Connecticut as the weekend sports anchor, thereafter he took on many play-by-play and reporter roles for the Big East Digital Network. From there, he went to ESPN, calling various college sports and high school football.

“As cliché as it is, trust the process. Bet on yourself. If things aren’t going well, work twice as hard. Don’t think day to day, but think long term,” he said. “If I didn’t double down on myself and bet on myself I wouldn’t be at ESPN or speaking at Newhouse today. I wouldn’t be in broadcasting at all.”

Given the talent and passion Alter has shouted through the airwaves, it had to start somewhere. He said it wasn’t just that determination and grit that got him to where he is. Countless times, Alter told students that it’s more about the human connection you make in this industry that will get you far.

“Relationships are your resume in this business. Without relationships, you’re never going to get hired because you can’t hand someone a piece of paper in this business and say ‘hire me.’ You need somebody that’s going to go to war for you,” said Alter.

He advocated for making connections, a common piece of advice from Newhouse alum and staff alike.

“All of those relationships start in Syracuse and start at Newhouse,” said Alter. “I wouldn’t be where I am today without those relationships and it’s all because of this school and this program.”

Syracuse Rolls Past the Panthers, Again

March 2, 2020

Story by Alyssa Lyons, Photos by Nicholas D’Alessandro SYRACUSE, N.Y. – The color pink has many meanings and attributes, but most of all it has a meaning of its own for one month, Breast Cancer Awareness. The same words shocked the Syracuse women’s basketball team when one of their 14 was diagnosed. That same awareness […]

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Story by Alyssa Lyons, Photos by Nicholas D’Alessandro


SYRACUSE, N.Y. – The color pink has many meanings and attributes, but most of all it has a meaning of its own for one month, Breast Cancer Awareness. The same words shocked the Syracuse women’s basketball team when one of their 14 was diagnosed. That same awareness was celebrated during halftime Sunday, Feb. 16, 2020 when the Orange slipped past the University of Pittsburgh 71-53.
It was the annual #Play4Kay game, only this time with the addition #Tough4T. During halftime, 15 women who are in the midst of, and succeeded in the fight against Breast Cancer were recognized – including Syracuse’s own Tiana Mangakahia. As the parade of survivors and current fighters entered Jim Boeheim court, Mangakahia addressed the crowd for the first time since her diagnosis last year.

Mangakahia, addressing the crowd.


The Streak
Syracuse taking down the Panthers extended their win streak to four. This is the third time this season where they’ve held off ACC foes below 54 pts. The Orange started off strong, taking the first half by storm retrieving to the locker room with a 14-point lead. There was no evidence of the Orange struggling with points outside the paint. Between the game in North Carolina and the one in the Dome, the Orange have shot down 20 from the arc. Late in the first quarter within less than two minutes, Taleah Washington, Kiara Lewis and Teisha Hyman knocked down a shot from three. Forward Digna Strautmane grabbed three on the night, a repeat from Thursday’s win against the Tar Heels. Strautmane surpassed her season-high of 17 points, ending the game with 18. Coach Quentin Hillsman, recording two more wins from his 300-career tally, said Strautmane was “aggressive on all three levels of the floor.”


Kiara Lewis said the win was attributed to sharing the ball. Coach Q’s crew recorded 15 assists, 6 of those coming from Lewis. The Orange took the lead for 38 minutes of the contest. In the second half alone, Syracuse outscored Pittsburgh 33-29.
Syracuse recorded 19 fouls, meanwhile Pitt picked up 15. The Orange capitalized on points at the line going 15-18. Kiara Lewis was perfect, grabbing 4-4. Consequently, Pitt was not, and struggled to find the rim, 12-22.

Orange Fall and Foul Against the Wolfpack

February 20, 2020

Story and Photos by Alyssa Lyons SYRACUSE, N.Y. – For the second game in a row, Syracuse’s Basketball team worked their opponents until the last minute without top scorer, No. 2 in the ACC, Elijah Hughes, this time coming up short 79-74. This was the sixth conference match-up of the season that has been decided […]

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Story and Photos by Alyssa Lyons

SYRACUSE, N.Y. – For the second game in a row, Syracuse’s Basketball team worked their opponents until the last minute without top scorer, No. 2 in the ACC, Elijah Hughes, this time coming up short 79-74. This was the sixth conference match-up of the season that has been decided with 4 points or less.

In warm-ups Hughes suffered a left groin strain and left the game 2:33 into the half. With Hughes out, Jim Boeheim looked to young talent, freshmen Joe Girard III and Quincy Guerrier to put a stop to the Wolfpack’s Devon Daniels and C.J. Bryce.

The Orange started off the first half looking strong, but it was quickly cut short when N.C. State took a scoring run to put the Wolfpack up 12-7 with 7:34 to go. Missed shots from the field set the Orange behind, only knocking down 2 of 13. The Wolfpack converted on 4 of 9.

Guerrier and Girard set the rhythm near the end of the first half of play, earning a combined 23 points to set the Orange under by four against the Wolfpack, 39-35. Girard would pick up his one and only successful shot from the arc, along with two from Buddy Boeheim. Successful chances from the circle have been a struggle for Boeheim’s team this season. Syracuse went 3-18 from the arc forcing opportunities in the lane.

The Orange found success driving through the paint early in the second half nearing the five-minute mark setting a one-point divide with a score of 68-69. Syracuse grabbed 40 points in the paint Tuesday night, a handful compared to N.C. State’s 26. Bulldozing through the paint was Girard, who picked up a new record, most points by a freshman in the Carrier Dome (30) and tied Dwayne “Pearl” Washington for second most points by a freshman in program history. Carmelo Anthony is the only Orange freshman with more points, recording 33 against Texas on April 5, 2003 in the Final Four.

Foul trouble and missed three-pointers have plagued Syracuse basketball this season. Bourama Sidibe earned his fourth foul less than a minute into the second half. When he returned late in the game, he picked up his fifth nearing a minute to go. In four straight games, Sidibe has fouled out. Buddy Boeheim did the same with 22 seconds left on the clock, and Marek Dolezaj ended with four. Foul trouble was also in the Orange’s favor as the Wolfpack’s center, Manny Bates received four, limiting the leading shot blocker to 14 minutes.

The Orange will need to take home wins against their next two ACC opponents to keep tournament chances alive.

Blue Devils Beat Orange 97-88

February 5, 2020

Story by Maria Trivelpiece, Photos by Kyla Wright SYRACUSE, N.Y. – Syracuse and Duke possess two of the most decorated coaches in college basketball. This was the most anticipated matchup for Orange fans. Feb. 1 had been circled on their calendars since the schedule came out. Their team had been playing well, winning five of […]

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Story by Maria Trivelpiece, Photos by Kyla Wright

SYRACUSE, N.Y. – Syracuse and Duke possess two of the most decorated coaches in college basketball. This was the most anticipated matchup for Orange fans. Feb. 1 had been circled on their calendars since the schedule came out. Their team had been playing well, winning five of their last six games. It looked promising. Duke came into town as the no. 9 team in the country – a ranking lower than years passed. The game would be the top-notch opponent win that the Orange needed. A win that they needed, but didn’t get. The Blue Devils arrived in the packed Carrier Dome and defeated Syracuse 97-88 on Saturday night. They won because Syracuse could not “stop the big guy” – a problem that Head Coach Jim Boeheim says has been a year-long issue.

Coming out hot in the first half, Syracuse held the lead until the last 40 seconds when Duke benefitted from two Alex O’Connell foul shots, making the score 38-36. The Blue Devils seemed shaken up by the crowd of over 31,000 as they did not score a field goal until over two minutes into the game. Marek Dolezaj dropped ten in the first half, leading him into a career-high of 22 points. “He’s playing great and stays out of foul trouble,” said Coach Boeheim.

Despite Dolezaj’s offensive efforts, him and his fellow forwards could not contain Vernon Carey. The 6’10” freshman had twelve points and eight rebounds within the first twenty minutes. Heading into the locker room at halftime, Duke led Syracuse 40-36 and Coach Boeheim said, “We have to do something about that big guy,” but Syracuse didn’t.

Duke quickly extended their four-point lead to nine and continued to climb. The Orange kept the game within at least ten with some big blocks from Elijah Hughes and some big threes by Buddy Boeheim. With a little over a minute to play, they were within seven. Syracuse was forced to foul. Tre Jones made both foul shots and the game became out of reach.

Carey finished the night with 26 points and 17 rebounds. Coach K said, “He was hungry. He attacked the zone and played well.” Coach Boeheim also gave credit to the freshman saying, “The big kid is really good. He’s got great hands, and he’s really tough down there.”

Boeheim said his team is getting better, but they still have to get even better. If they want to beat the good teams, they need to stop people in the paint. He also said that his team needs to shoot the ball a little better, something they haven’t done in the last two games.

Syracuse will have a week off and then will be back in the Dome on Saturday, Feb. 8th at 8 PM.

Women’s Basketball suffer season’s biggest loss

January 28, 2020

Story by Nicholas Ursini, Photos by Racquel Stephen SYRACUSE, N.Y. – The Syracuse Women’s Basketball Team (9-9, 3-4 ACC) led for just 18 seconds in the game. Kiara Lewis hit a layup right off the tip, and it was all Duke from there. The Blue Devils (10-9, 4-4 ACC) cruised to an 88-58 victory Thursday […]

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Story by Nicholas Ursini, Photos by Racquel Stephen

SYRACUSE, N.Y. – The Syracuse Women’s Basketball Team (9-9, 3-4 ACC) led for just 18 seconds in the game. Kiara Lewis hit a layup right off the tip, and it was all Duke from there. The Blue Devils (10-9, 4-4 ACC) cruised to an 88-58 victory Thursday night inside the Dome.

In the first quarter, Duke had the Syracuse press figured out, leading to easy transition layups and quick scores. In total, Syracuse had 22 turnovers while forcing 18. However, the biggest difference came from points in the paint.

The Blue Devils scored 46 of their 88 points in the paint, thanks in part to Leaonna Odom who scored a game high of 23 points along with ten rebounds, six offensively and four defensively.

Odom shot 11-of-14 from the field.

Duke had a 21-11 lead going into the second quarter and that quarter was much of the same as the first. Syracuse had no answer for Duke’s scoring tonight.

The Orange were just 5-of-30 from three-point land and overall were 20-of-62 from the field. On the other side, Duke was nearly 50 percent from the floor (33-of-67) and 8-of-15 from three-point territory.

Duke led at halftime 49-28 and Syracuse still couldn’t recover after the break.

Kiara Lewis played all 40 minutes and led the Orange with 14 points. Lewis was 3-of-14 from the field and 0-and-5 from downtown.

Maeva Djaldi-Tabdi was second in scoring with 12 points, Gabby Cooper had 11 and Digna Strautmane had seven.

Syracuse’s Gabrielle Cooper, playing defense against Duke’s Haley Gorecki.

The 30-point difference was Syracuse’s biggest loss of the season and tied for its lowest point total.

While Odom took care of business inside the paint, Haley Gorecki and Mikayla Boykin put on a shooting clinic from mid-range and three-point land. On top of outrebounding Syracuse 47-to-33, the Orange could not keep up with Boykin.

She made five of her three-point attempts, including four in a 63-second stretch in the second quarter pushing Duke’s lead to 20 points.

Gorecki finished with 19 points, five rebounds, and nine assists.

After the game, Coach Quentin Hillsman harped on a lack of discipline from his defense and not sticking to their game plan.

“When your game is predicated on trying to create turnovers and pressure, it is tough,” said Hillsman. “Give Duke credit, they did a good job attacking our press before could set up. They attacked us downhill and we played unsettled defense pretty much the entire game.”

While down by 21 at halftime, his message to his team was, “we are still going to compete.” Coach Hillsman had no intention of stopping the press.

“I am never going to stop. Either we are going to figure it out and play our way, or we are going to have more games like this because I am not going to back down,” said Hillsman. “We need to play the way we need to play to be successful.”

Syracuse Defeats Notre Dame 74-63 in OT

January 21, 2020

Story by Maria Trivelpiece, Photo by Tanner Russ SYRACUSE, N.Y. – The Syracuse University women’s basketball team defeated the Notre Dame Fighting Irish 74-63 in overtime at the Carrier Dome for the first time in Quentin Hillsman’s career.   Starting off, Amaya Finklea-Guity won the jump ball and Kiara Lewis sunk a jump shot 23 seconds […]

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Story by Maria Trivelpiece, Photo by Tanner Russ

SYRACUSE, N.Y. – The Syracuse University women’s basketball team defeated the Notre Dame Fighting Irish 74-63 in overtime at the Carrier Dome for the first time in Quentin Hillsman’s career.  

Starting off, Amaya Finklea-Guity won the jump ball and Kiara Lewis sunk a jump shot 23 seconds later. As a team, they shot 30.4% (7-for-23) from the floor, with 12 rebounds. They also forced eight Notre Dame turnovers.  

In the second quarter, Syracuse struggled to score, eventually allowing Notre Dame to tie it up with two free throws, an “and-one” and another free throw made by Mikayla Vaughn. The Orange took the lead again with back-to-back three pointers from Kiara Lewis and Emily Engstler, but by the end of the period, the score was tied at 31 heading into halftime.  

The third quarter was led by the Fighting Irish, outscoring Syracuse 18-10, shooting fifty percent from the floor and making both threes they took. Notre Dame continued this dominance into the fourth, but with just under three minutes to go, Lewis drove and made the layup, putting the Orange within two.  

The Irish stretched their lead to 60-57 when Amaya Peoples made two free throws; but with 6.9 seconds to go in the game, Lewis made a three-pointer to tie the game. Notre Dame got the ball back and had one more shot opportunity, but a block by Digna Strautmane sent the game into overtime. 

Engstler started things off with a layup and Strautmane followed shortly after. The Orange scored eleven points before the Irish’s Katlyn Gilbert made a layup. In overtime, Syracuse outscored Notre Dame 14-3, sealing the victory.  

This is the first time in his coaching career that Coach Quentin Hillsman has beat Notre Dame, and the first time Syracuse defeated them since 2002.

Michigan fends off Purdue in 2OT

January 21, 2020

Story and Photo by Nicholas D’Alessandro ANN ARBOR, M.I. – The Michigan Men’s Basketball team bounced back from their recent loss against #8 Michigan State with a gritty 84-78 double overtime win against the Purdue Boilermakers. Michigan (11-4, 2-2) was led by senior point guard Zavier Simpson, who shot 9-13 for 22 points and dished […]

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Story and Photo by Nicholas D’Alessandro

ANN ARBOR, M.I. – The Michigan Men’s Basketball team bounced back from their recent loss against #8 Michigan State with a gritty 84-78 double overtime win against the Purdue Boilermakers. Michigan (11-4, 2-2) was led by senior point guard Zavier Simpson, who shot 9-13 for 22 points and dished out 9 assists and senior center Jon Teske, who had 18 points and 9 rebounds. Purdue was led by sophomore center Travien Williams, who ended with 36 points and 20 rebounds.

Teske and freshman guard Franz Wagner accounted for Michigan’s first 13 points.  After attempting 15 shots between Matt Haarns and Williams, Purdue emphasized pounding the ball down low.

Senior center Austin Davis scored both times on his only attempts. Around the same time, Haarns got hurt and was out the rest of the night. When asked about it afterwards, Purdue Head Coach Matt Painter said he was told it was a hip flexor at halftime, but he hadn’t talked to the trainer postgame yet.

Despite tight and aggressive one-on-one defense by Teske, Williams continued to make tough shots. The Wolverines held slim leads throughout most of the first half and led 32-28 at halftime.

To start the second half, Purdue got their momentum back. They had a 12-2 run early in the second half to go up 42-36, including back-to-back three pointers by freshman guard Isaiah Thompson. From then on, the teams went back and forth with a score of 47-44 with about one quarter remaining.

Every time Michigan would get momentum, it seemed as if Williams would get a big bucket to silence the crowd. With Haarns out, Painter relied on Williams and he kept delivering.

Michigan Head Coach Juwan Howard implemented a smaller line-up about halfway through the second half that paid dividends. Painter said Michigan sophomore guard David DeJulius’ bounce gave them the most trouble when the smaller lineup came in.

The lineup switch also seemed to open up the game from a scoring perspective for Simpson, and he did just that.

He didn’t attempt a shot for the first 18 minutes of the game and was 2-2 with 4 points at halftime. Simpson said afterwards that Howard told him that the defense wasn’t conducive to him scoring. The NCAA’s second-highest assist leader instead focused on facilitating and had 6 assists at halftime.

As the game was winding down, Simpson consistently scored at the hoop with crossovers and off-handed layups. He tied the game at 62, with 19 seconds left. Purdue used a timeout to draw an in-bounds play for what would be the final shot.

Sophomore guard Eric Hunter Jr. dribbled the clock out and drove to the line. He dropped it off to Williams in the paint, but Wagner blocked it just in time, sending the game into overtime.

In the first overtime, Michigan jumped out to a 66-62 lead on the heels of a Simpson drive and two made free throws. Purdue then tied it at 66 with two free throws by Williams. Purdue once again found themselves with a chance to win it on a buzzer beater. This time, Hunter took a jump shot and missed it with about four seconds left. This left time for Simpson to heave a game winner for Michigan just inside mid-court but it turned into a second overtime tied at 68.

In the second overtime, Teske started off with a three-point play followed by a Simpson three, the next time down. With Michigan fans celebrating, Franz Wagner hit a corner three to put Michigan up 77-68 with just over two and a half to play. Despite some missed free throws down the stretch, Michigan came out with the 84-78 victory.

Afterwards, Simpson said that Howard told them that double overtimes are from the neck up, meaning they are about mental focus.

Howard said Simpson is a gamer. He also added, “I’m happy we have our Tom Brady.”

Orange snap three-game skid, rolling by UMBC

January 21, 2020

Story by Bailey Arredondo, Photos by Kris Wan SYRACUSE, N.Y. –  The Orange (5-4) came off their first three-game losing streak since the 2013-14 season and over two weeks on the road. “I’m tired and I know they are tired,” said head coach Quentin Hillsman. “But with our schedule we want to get ourselves ready […]

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Story by Bailey Arredondo, Photos by Kris Wan

SYRACUSE, N.Y. –  The Orange (5-4) came off their first three-game losing streak since the 2013-14 season and over two weeks on the road. “I’m tired and I know they are tired,” said head coach Quentin Hillsman. “But with our schedule we want to get ourselves ready for the NCAA tournament and ACC play.”

The contest started with the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (2-7) matching Syracuse’s intensity coming out the gate and only trailed 17-15 after the first quarter. But it was Junior forward Digna Strautmane that provided the offensive spark and a 11-2 run in the last four minutes of the first half. Strautmane hit four from beyond the arc and scored 14 points for the Orange to build an unwavering lead.

Strautmane, as she shoots a layup in the game against UMBC.

“This game was different because they didn’t scout me good enough,” said Strautmane on how she was able to get into an offensive flow. “Usually the teams we play take my shot away, but today I was able to find my shot.”

Syracuse built their lead in the second half and continued to push the pace of the game. The pace transpired into largest run of the game, 28-8, over 10 minutes and a lead of 64-39 at the end of the third quarter.

The Orange dominated the glass, 50-35, and scored 40 points inside the paint. Strautmane finished with 17 points and three blocks. Amaya Finklea-Guity was efficient with 13 points on 6-of-8 shooting.

Syracuse also saw production from the bench as freshman Teisha Hyman added valuable minutes with a career-high 16 points on 60 percent shooting.

“Teisha was fantastic and a really tough guard in the half court, her effort and our effort in the second half was great,” said coach Hillsman.

Te’yjah Oliver, a 20 point per game scorer, lead UMBC with 15 points but had seven of the team’s 21 turnovers. Syracuse was everywhere on defense, forcing 12 steals and recording six blocks as a team.