• History of Excellence

    History of Excellence

    Today’s Syracuse University students pursuing careers in sports media are part of a tradition that goes back more than 70 years. The great sportscaster Marty Glickman ’39 is recognized as the “godfather” of a long line of SU sports media professionals that includes Bob Costas ’74, Hank Greenwald ’57, Dave Pasch ’94, Dick Stockton ’64, Andy Musser ’59, Marv Albert ’63, Len Berman ’68, G’70, Sean McDonough ’84, Mike Tirico ’88, Ian Eagle ’90, Dave O’Brien ’86 and many more–not only in sports broadcasting but also in sports writing, editing, production and management at the national and local levels.

  • Professional Sports Coverage

    Professional Sports Coverage

    Students in the Sports Communications Emphasis have covered the Syracuse Chiefs (AAA baseball) and have written columns focused on Major League Baseball, the National Football League and Mixed Martial Arts. Students also work with the Syracuse Crunch, the Syracuse Stampede Junior “A” Hockey Club and the Silver Knights Professional Indoor Soccer Club. Future coverage will include more writing and reporting as well as commentary on professional sports.

  • SU Sports Coverage

    SU Sports Coverage

    Newhouse School graduate students in the Sports Communications Emphasis serve as credentialed reporters covering Syracuse University teams. Their stories appear on this website in text, photo and video format, and they also contribute to campus media outlets covering sports. Students have covered SU football, cross country, basketball, crew and lacrosse, and there’s more to come.

  • Leading Sports Media Personalities

    Leading Sports Media Personalities

    When you look to the top of the sports broadcasting profession you see Syracuse alumni everywhere you turn: from NBC’s Bob Costas ’74 to ABC/ESPN’s Mike Tirico ’88 to Marv Albert ’63, the Voice of the NBA, plus ESPN’s Sean McDonough ’84, Dave Pasch ’94, Dave O’Brien ’86 and Beth Mowins G’90 and CBS’ Ian Eagle ’90. Former SU football and basketball stars such as Daryl Johnston ’89, Don McPherson ’88, Donovan McNabb ’98 and Leo Rautins ’83 have moved into the broadcast booth. SU alums are play-by-play voices for the Boston Red Sox (Dave O’Brien ’86 and Joe Castiglione G’70), San Francisco Giants (Dave Flemming G’99), Minnesota Twins (Cory Provus ’00) and Houston Astros (Robert Ford ’01). Personalities such as Bill Roth ’87 (Virginia Tech), Tony Caridi ’84 (West Virginia) and SU’s own Voice of the Orange Matt Park ’89 call games for Division One college programs.

  • Mentoring Tomorrow’s Pros

    Mentoring Tomorrow’s Pros

    SU alumni in sports media have always been willing to mentor and advise students. Whether returning to campus to speak and meet with the next generation of sports media professionals, Skyping with them, critiquing demo reels and clips or helping students make internship and job contacts, Orange alumni are always there. The Newhouse Sports Media Center helps make those connections between students and alumni.

Quote of the Day

Charlie Pallilo

"There is no silver bullet that you can fire or clear bread crumb path that you can track. I would say definitely dip your toes in to as many different pools as you can to find out what you like more than other things, what you may have aptitude for more than other things…I just think anything that broadens your mind, develops your analytical thinking, pushes you maybe outside your comfort zone a little bit, just to explore all the different job tracks that you might be able to pursue."

-- Charlie Pallilo

Events

Nick Wright Newhouse Sports Media Center

Fox Sports’ Nick Wright ’07

Tuesday, August 30, 2016

9:00 pm - 10:30 pm

I-3 Center (432 NH3)

More info

Anthony Calhoun Newhouse Sports Media Center

WISH-TV Sports Director Anthony Calhoun ’95

Thursday, September 15, 2016

5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

I-3 Center (432 NH3)

More info

Videos

2016 Marty Glickman Award for Leadership in Sports Media

July 25, 2016

2016 Glickman Award Ceremony pt 1

2016 Glickman Award Ceremony pt 1

Greeting & Dean Branham’s Welcome

Watch Now

2016 Glickman Award Ceremony pt 2

2016 Glickman Award Ceremony pt 2

Introduction & Jason Benetti

Watch Now

2016 Glickman Award Ceremony pt 9

2016 Glickman Award Ceremony pt 9

Sean McDonough

Watch Now

Sports Matters 2016

February 24, 2016

The Face of the Future in Sports Media—who will it be and how will it be done?

The Face of the Future in Sports Media—who will it be and how will it be done?

Panelists include:

- Robert Lipsyte, sports writer, columnist, author and former ESPN ombudsman;
- Jodi Logsdon '03, news director and coordinating producer, CBS Sports;
- Raul Martinez G'04, sports reporter/anchor, KDVR Fox Denver;
- Robert Ford '01, radio play-by-play announcer, Houston Astros.

Dean Lorraine Branham will moderate.

Watch Now

How do you tell a reporter and analyst from a commentator from a spokesperson and does it matter?

How do you tell a reporter and analyst from a commentator from a spokesperson and does it matter?

Panelists include:

- Chris Broussard, analyst and sports writer, ESPN and ABC;
- Jim Axelrod, anchor and correspondent, CBS News/60 Minutes Sports;
- Kelly Saco '12, in-game reporter, Miami Marlins and University of Miami;
- Ron Wechsler G'93, senior vice president for original programming and development, NBC Sports Group.

Joel Kaplan, associate dean in the Newhouse School, will moderate.

Watch Now

Covering Women's Sports—why is it important and how should it be done?

Covering Women's Sports—why is it important and how should it be done?

Panelists include:

- Vera Jones '88, G'91, analyst, Big Ten Network;
- Chris Hannan '95, executive vice president of communications and integration, Fox Sports;
- Josh Barnett '94, director of content, USA Today Sports;
- Laurie Orlando '87, senior vice president of talent strategy, CBS News.

Anne Osborne, associate professor of communications in the Newhouse School, will moderate.

Watch Now

Beth Mowins

November 4, 2015

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The title

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Student Reporting

Volleyball: Colgate Comes Back to Beat Orange

Volleyball: Colgate Comes Back to Beat Orange

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Story and photo by Kelsey Snider

SYRACUSE, N.Y. – From the sound pouring out of the Women’s Building, you could tell volleyball was back in action for their season opening weekend.

On Sunday, the Syracuse women’s volleyball team fell to Colgate (1-3) in an intense four-set match making the Orange record 0-2. Syracuse won the first set 25-18, and looked strong coming into the next three sets, but just couldn’t hold it (22-25, 23-25, 22-25).
“It’s a lack of confidence,” head coach Leonid Yelin told Cuse.com http://cuse.com/news/2016/8/28/volleyball-first-set-surge-not-enough-in-home-loss-to-colgate.aspx
“It’s a game of momentum. It happens to much better teams, but they can respond much faster back. That’s why I’m saying lack of experience, and based off of that, we start losing our confidence.

“We were responding a little bit late. Giving up more than a couple points puts us in a situation where we’re deep in a hole and have to dig ourselves out. That definitely did not help us. We are painfully learning to stay focused. We lose and now we get ready to play.”

Even though SU led in points, with outside Mackenzie Weaver leading the team with 20.5 points, and blocking led by middle blocker Amber Witherspoon, with six blocks, it was the SU offense that became its downfall. The Orange trailed the Raiders in kills, assists and hitting efficiency.

 

On Friday, September 2, the Orange will take on the Oregon State Beavers in Lincoln, Nebraska at the Nebraska Invite.

 

Volleyball will be back at home in the Women’s Building on Friday, Sept. 9, where Syracuse will play against Hofstra at 1 p.m. in the Syracuse Tournament.

Syracuse Women’s Soccer Defeats Albany Great Danes

Syracuse Women’s Soccer Defeats Albany Great Danes

Story and photo by Jacqueline Mundry SYRACUSE N.Y. – The heat didn’t seem to hurt the home team on Sunday when the Syracuse women’s soccer team beat the University of Albany 2-0 at the SU Soccer Stadium. With the temperature pushing 90 degrees, the Orange improved its record to 3-0-1 on the season – the […]

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Story and photo by Jacqueline Mundry

SYRACUSE N.Y. – The heat didn’t seem to hurt the home team on Sunday when the Syracuse women’s soccer team beat the University of Albany 2-0 at the SU Soccer Stadium.

With the temperature pushing 90 degrees, the Orange improved its record to 3-0-1 on the season – the team’s best start since 2003.

Although head coach Phil Wheddon said he’s “not one for records” he credited the team and its chemistry for the success in the first four games.

“They work very hard and they’re a very close knit group and I think that has a massive part of all of it,” Wheddon said.

 

Defense and scoring

Junior goalkeeper Courtney Brosnan recorded her third straight shutout.

“I think the defense has really been stepping up so we’re working really well so far,” she said.

From the start, the Orange put pressure on Albany’s goalkeeper Chloe Boarasky with a total of eight shots on goal.

Senior defender Maddie Iozzi scored the first goal  in the fourth minute of play. This was Iozzi’s first goal of the season.

“At first I was going to cross it then at last minute I changed my mind,” Iozzi said, “I saw the back post open so I just went for it.”

With the first goal coming early in the game, it set the tone for the rest of the half with another goal at minute 18. Freshman defender Taylor Bennett scored her first career goal on a 35-yard free kick.

 

Second half: Wheddon wants more

The second half was scoreless and Wheddon said that the team needs to get better at playing its hardest for the entire game,

“When you go into the ACC part of the season, we’ve got to be able to sustain an all out attack for 90 minutes.”

 

Next

 

The next task for the Orange is Bucknell University.

“We’ll certainly work on the finishing,” Wheddon said. We’ll scout Bucknell to make sure our team has that information and then we’ll come up with a game plan,”

The SU women’s soccer team will host the Bucknell Bisons on Thursday at 4 p.m. at the Syracuse Soccer Stadium.

Boeheim & Anthony: Success Beyond Syracuse

Boeheim & Anthony: Success Beyond Syracuse

Story and photos by Matt D’Ambrosi SYRACUSE, N.Y. – You didn’t have to look any farther than the name outside the building where Syracuse University Men’s Basketball Coach Jim Boeheim was speaking Tuesday afternoon to feel the connection. Fresh off of helping guide the USA Basketball Men’s National Team to the gold medal in this year’s […]

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Story and photos by Matt D’Ambrosi

SYRACUSE, N.Y. – You didn’t have to look any farther than the name outside the building where Syracuse University Men’s Basketball Coach Jim Boeheim was speaking Tuesday afternoon to feel the connection.

Fresh off of helping guide the USA Basketball Men’s National Team to the gold medal in this year’s Rio Olympics, Boeheimwas standing at a podium fielding questions about the experience in a building named after one of his former players and arguably the biggest star of this year’s Olympic squad – Carmelo Anthony.

“He’s always helped us here; with this building,” Boeheim said. “We wouldn’t be in this building if it wasn’t for him.”

The building Boeheim is referring to, of course, is the Carmelo K. Anthony Centeron Syracuse University’s campus – perhaps the most concrete aspect of Anthony’s legacy at SU – equipped with amenities necessary to keep a program such as Boeheim’s competitive on a national level.

Anthony banners

Time after time

Even though Boeheim is long removed from having coached Anthony during his lone season playing for the Orange in 2003 that resulted in a national championship, being a part of USA Basketball has given Boeheim the opportunity to team now and again with Anthony at different points throughout their respective journeys.

And the results have been tremendous.

Boeheim and Anthony have both been a part of each of the last three USA Basketball Men’s National Teams to compete in the Olympics, all of which have won gold medals starting with Beijing in 2008, then London in 2012 and now in Rio in 2016.

In this year’s competition in Rio, Anthony’s play on the court led to him becoming the all-time leading scorer in USA Basketball Men’s National Team Olympic history. But according to Boeheim, Anthony was a crucial part of this year’s team off the court as well.

“He was a really good leader on this year’s team,” Boeheim said. “When we were struggling there, he was a good voice in the locker room [to] keep everybody together.”

When asked about this year’s Olympics perhaps being the last time Boeheim will get to coach his former star, the two’s long history together showed through.

“He’s just such a great kid,” Boeheim said. “He really is not a kid any more, but to me he is. He just gets along with everybody. He always has. He’s always given back.”

 

Basketball is Home for LaChina Robinson

Basketball is Home for LaChina Robinson

Story by Michelle Fenelon.  Photo: LaChina Robinson’s Instagram page SYRACUSE, N.Y. — Women in LaChina Robinson’s family don’t play sports. It’s not what they do. So, when a man approached Robinson to play basketball when she was 14-years-old, she says she and her mother initially shrugged him off. Robinson wanted to be like her friends […]

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Story by Michelle Fenelon. 
Photo: LaChina Robinson’s Instagram page

SYRACUSE, N.Y.Women in LaChina Robinson’s family don’t play sports. It’s not what they do. So, when a man approached Robinson to play basketball when she was 14-years-old, she says she and her mother initially shrugged him off.

Robinson wanted to be like her friends and cheer for athletes on the sidelines as a cheerleader, but she kept growing. With a 6-foot-4 frame, Robinson was destined to be on the court while others cheered for her.

Although basketball wasn’t her first choice, she found it was the best decision for a young girl who needed to learn how to be comfortable within her own skin – and height.

“I felt like I belonged on the court,” Robin said in a telephone interview.

When she played basketball she didn’t feel out of place despite her height.

“When you’re a 6’4” girl, there’s not a lot of places where you feel comfortable as you’re growing into yourself and your self-esteem and your confidence and things. So, I really felt empowered on the court. I made friends; I was learning so many life skills.”

After four years at Wake Forest, Robinson took different paths before landing a job as a sports broadcaster, working college basketball and WNBA games for ESPN and Fox Sports South. She never had dreams of becoming a sports broadcaster; much like basketball, the career found her.

She tried to become an Athletic Director. She thought about becoming a lawyer. She even took sociology classes, which she enjoyed, but she didn’t know what career she could pursue. Despite her willingness to explore different careers, her journey led her back to basketball.

When Robinson was asked to do radio for the Georgia Tech women’s basketball team, she accepted. And after her first broadcast, she knew right away it was her calling. From then on, she searched for any opportunity to help advance her career.

“I wasn’t a Broadcast Major, I wasn’t a Communications major,” Robinson said. “So I just tried to find ways to get in front of the camera, and try to find ways to network and let people know this is what I’m passionate about.”

Through broadcasting, Robinson found her way back to basketball. Although, she wasn’t on the court battling defenders to grab rebounds, or forcing her opponents to alter their shots when they entered the paint. She wasn’t lacing up her sneakers anymore, but she was home.

The Centenarian In The Stands

The Centenarian In The Stands

Originally published August 7 Story and photos by Matt D’Ambrosi   SYRACUSE, N.Y. – Baseball is commonly known for being a game of numbers. But at Wednesday night’s match-up between the Syracuse Chiefs and Buffalo Bisons at NBT Bank Stadium, there was a number outside of the actual game that just simply could not be […]

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Originally published August 7

Story and photos by Matt D’Ambrosi
 

SYRACUSE, N.Y. – Baseball is commonly known for being a game of numbers. But at Wednesday night’s match-up between the Syracuse Chiefs and Buffalo Bisons at NBT Bank Stadium, there was a number outside of the actual game that just simply could not be overlooked – 100.

It wasn’t a number reflective of some sort of streak or attendance record. It’s the age of a legend. It’s the age of a former prisoner of war and World War II veteran. It’s the age of someone who earned both his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Syracuse University in the years 1937 and 1939, respectively.

It’s the age of former Syracuse Chiefs President Don Waful. Waful, who was wearing a red and blue Hawaiian shirt at the game, was sitting where he normally does while attending Chiefs games.

Waful stadium seat

He was stationed in one of his two blue seats down the third-base line, with the empty seat next to him having on it the remnants of a label that read “PRESIDENTS SEAT.”

“I picked these two seats when the stadium was on the drawing board with the architects,” said Waful during the International League contest that saw the Chiefs pull out a 6-1 victory over the Bisons.

The centenarian is undoubtedly a mainstay at Chiefs games. He served as president of the organization from 1971 to 2006, a time-span in which it was, at different points, the minor-league affiliate for the New York Yankees and Toronto Blue Jays.

Since retiring from that post, however, the native Syracusan now has the opportunity to watch the Chiefs take the diamond from a different standpoint.

“Unfortunately, I’m not involved with it like I used to be,” Waful said. “I could never come to a game without being involved in some managerial thing. Now I come just to enjoy it.”

It’s abundantly clear that Waful still takes tremendous pride in being a part of the Syracuse Chiefs – even if now only as a spectator.

“There’s only 30 triple-A clubs in America, and we’re one of them,” Waful said.

Thus, such exclusivity makes Tuesday’s news that the Onondaga County Legislature approved a new agreement involving the Chiefs’ leasing of NBT Bank Stadium all the more pertinent.  The lease- agreement puts Syracuse in position to continue to be the home for the organization – at least until 2026.

Waful, having spent years and years of his life around the Chiefs, says having a minor-league ball club adds value to the city.

“It’s a beautiful asset to the culture and the sports community in Syracuse,” Waful said.

Because of his career in baseball, Waful has been able to watch the likes of players such as Denny McLain, Rod Guidry and Ray Oyler. But because of his longevity, he has had a whole host of unbelievable experiences that have helped to shape his outlook on living.

“I’m so convinced about the richness of life,” Waful said.

Voth And Late Power-Up Allow Chiefs To Best Bisons

Voth And Late Power-Up Allow Chiefs To Best Bisons

Originally reported on August 7 Story by Mike Drew Photos by Mike Drew and Newhouse Sports Media Center Staff SYRACUSE, N.Y. — A sun-splashed summer night at NBT Bank Stadium. His 21st start of the season. His team needing a spark after losing the second game of a doubleheader Tuesday night. This was Austin Voth’s moment, […]

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Originally reported on August 7

Story by Mike Drew

Photos by Mike Drew and Newhouse Sports Media Center Staff


SYRACUSE, N.Y. — A sun-splashed summer night at NBT Bank Stadium. His 21st start of the season. His team needing a spark after losing the second game of a doubleheader Tuesday night. This was Austin Voth’s moment, and he owned it.

The 24-year old right hander dazzled the Buffalo Bisons Wednesday night, leading to a 6-1 Syracuse victory. Voth pitched seven strong innings, yielding only one earned run and collected his sixth win of the season.

Voth was not available after the game but his manager, Billy Gardner, Jr., said the Redmond, Wash. native delivered exactly what his team needed on the mound.

“His command was real good,” he said. “He used his fastball really well. In and out. Up and down. Mixed in his breaking ball. He’s a very good competitor and he’s done a good job of keeping us in the game.”

Help comes early

Offensively, Voth was staked to an early 1-0 lead in the third inning. Highly touted center fielder Michael Taylor roped a ball off the top of Buffalo center-fielder Dalton Pompey’s glove for a single. Zach Collier, who led off the inning with a walk, scored from second base.

Limiting the damage

Buffalo starter Scott Copeland did his best to keep the Chiefs hitters at bay in the middle innings. He retired six out of seven batters in the fourth and fifth innings, providing his teammates with the opportunity to swing momentum in their direction. That’s exactly what they did in the top of the sixth inning.

In the only real trouble Voth faced all night, the Bisons’ number three and four hitters, Matt Dominguez (3-3, three singles and a walk) and Jesus Montero (2-3, two singles), both punched singles into the outfield to begin the frame.

Then, following a 5-4-3 double play, right fielder Junior Lake beat out an infield single to second base. Christopher Bostick managed to get to the ball for the Chiefs, but his throw to first base was just late. Dominguez scored and the game was knotted at 1-1.

Gone in a flash

Skole and reporters

The bottom of the sixth inning proved to be the turning point of the game. After Taylor lined out to center, third baseman Matt Skole stepped to the plate to face Chad Girodo, a left handed reliever summoned by Buffalo manager Gary Allenson for this specific matchup.

“I knew he was going to try and throw something soft to get me to chase,” Skole said. “But, he made a mistake.”

Did he ever. Skole crushed a solo home run well over the right field fence to give the Chiefs the lead again at 2-1.

Adding on

They never looked back. Left fielder Matt den Dekker added an RBI double in the inning to extend the lead to 3-1. Shortstop Jason Martinson tacked on a two-run double in the seventh off of right hander Matt Dermody.

Then, first baseman Caleb Ramsey capped off the night’s scoring by scorching a line drive home run to right against right hander Bobby Korecky in the eighth to make it a 6-1 game.

What’s next

The Chiefs and Bisons will meet once more on Thursday night to conclude the four-game series. The Chiefs will attempt to win three out of four games in the series.

“It’s a game of adjustments,” Gardner said. “And I see our guys right now making those.”

With the win, the Chiefs improved to 50-61 on the season, while the Bisons fell to .500 at 56-56.

Dan Shaughnessy: Boston’s Sports Guy

Dan Shaughnessy: Boston’s Sports Guy

Story by Jacqueline Mundry Photo: bostonglobe.com SYRACUSE N.Y. — Dan Shaughnessy is a household name in New England. Sports fans know him because they have likely read something he’s written during his over 30 years as a Boston Globe columnist. Shaughnessy has spent his whole career in Boston. Born in Groton, Massachusetts, he is a […]

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Story by Jacqueline Mundry

Photo: bostonglobe.com

SYRACUSE N.Y. — Dan Shaughnessy is a household name in New England. Sports fans know him because they have likely read something he’s written during his over 30 years as a Boston Globe columnist.

Shaughnessy has spent his whole career in Boston. Born in Groton, Massachusetts, he is a graduate of College of the Holy Cross and covered high school sports when he started at the Globe after college. From there, he’s worked his way up to become one of the most well known writers in New England.

Shaughnessy didn’t get to this position overnight, he says he began working towards his dreams at a young age and never stopped. He’s worked his way up to a point where he now gets paid to write his opinions, a luxury many people don’t have.

What he doesn’t like, is people that think they deserve that luxury when they haven’t proved themselves yet.

“I don’t like kids your age writing and sending me their stuff on their opinions of the Celtics.” Shaughnessy said in a telephone interview. “I don’t really care. I don’t like the Bill Simmons thing where you just stay home and watch TV and write your opinions. It’s just, I have no interest in that.”

Though Shaughnessy is a columnist and writes his opinions on an assortment of things, he has also covered many historic games in Boston sports history.

“When the Red Sox won in ’04 that was a pivotal story and everything changed in the landscape here and that’s one of the greatest narratives of all time for us,” he said. “I mean there was just the ’84 Celtics with Larry Bird and Magic. The first Super Bowl when the Pats won in New Orleans, you know it was great. Those kinds of things are the top.”

Shaughnessy, who has appeared on many TV and radio shows where he talked about sports, said that aspiring journalists have to get out there and do the work before you can write columns on their opinions.

 Listen to interview here:

 

https://soundcloud.com/user-316084698/danshaughnessy

Donnie’s View: Not Just from the Booth

Donnie’s View: Not Just from the Booth

Story and photos by Aubrie Tolliver SYRACUSE, NY — Passion has the ability to push limits, to drive someone past barriers or restraints. Whether those barriers are physical or mental, it makes no difference, as long as passion is the driving force behind it. For Don “Donnie” Johnston, the passion has always been sports. Johnston says, like anyone, […]

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Story and photos by Aubrie Tolliver

SYRACUSE, NY — Passion has the ability to push limits, to drive someone past barriers or restraints. Whether those barriers are physical or mental, it makes no difference, as long as passion is the driving force behind it.

For Don “Donnie” Johnston, the passion has always been sports.

Johnston says, like anyone, there are days when he faces his greatest challenges. But, a close friend once told him to “have the passion.” Since then, he says he’s been living by that motto.

“That keeps me going some days,” Johnston said between bustling about his duties at NBT Bank Stadium, Wednesday night. “There’s rough days in sports, there’s rough days in life. You just need the passion.”

His Barriers

As a kid growing up in Cleveland, N.Y., about 40 minutes northeast of Syracuse, Johnston wished he could to play sports. But what happened to him when he was an infant kept him from being able to.

Johnston was abused by his birth mother when he was just six weeks old and suffered a fractured skull, broken legs and ribs. He was in the hospital for four months.

From then on, Johnston grew up in a foster home, but the damage from the abuse was evident. The injuries he experienced left him with a speech impediment, physical impairments and a lifelong battle with depression.

In the Press Box

Don Johnston

“I wanted to be a radio broadcaster, I wanted to be a newspaper reporter,” Johnston said. “It took me within the last three, four or five years to go ‘Don, you’re good at being a press box manager, you’re good at making people happy, you’re good at doing what you do every day.”

Learning to accept his limitations has allowed him to thrive both personally and professionally, he says.

Johnston, also known as “Syracuse’s Donnie Baseball,” is the press box manager for the Syracuse Chiefs minor league baseball team. He shares the “Donnie Baseball” nickname with former N.Y. Yankees’ All-star and L.A. Dodgers’ manager Don Mattingly.

During the season, he can be found governing the press box, doing anything that’s needed of him. Whether it’s making copies, greeting guests, moderating interviews or restocking the kitchen,
even making sure Chiefs’ mascot Scooch is fed and watered.

Johnston does it all and does it eagerly; all while exerting the greatest amount of energy and enthusiasm.

Every now and then he’s able to steal a moment to himself and take advantage of the watching the baseball game from the best seat in the house.

But, just as he begins to settle in, he looks behind him and notices a new guest walk through the doors of the press box. Without hesitation he gets up to greet the new arrival –practically running to the door–and goes right back to work.

There is no off season for Johnston. Once baseball is over, it’s on to the next sport—football. Then basketball. Then hockey. He helps teams compose statistics for their games and seasons.

Johnston submerges himself in the sports world, and there is no other way he would rather it be, he says.

“Have the passion.”

Now at 56, Johnston says he has discovered his niche, or passion, in the sports world—numbers. And not just with sports statistics. Johnston is able to make large calculations in his head. In less than ten seconds, he can tell someone how old he or she is in days, not forgetting to take into account leap years.

Johnston says although the story of his life is full of difficulty and sadness, he hopes that by sharing it, he will inspire others to not only to find their own passions in life but to push past personal adversities keeping them from happiness.

Just like he has.

Sean McDonough ’84 Accepts “The Marty Award” – Photos

Sean McDonough ’84 Accepts “The Marty Award” – Photos

New York City – A star-studded gathering of sports media professionals, many of them Syracuse University and Newhouse School alums, joined family and friends on the evening of July 25 to honor Sean McDonough ’84, the ESPN veteran announcer who is about to begin his first season as the play-by-play voice of Monday Night Football as […]

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New York City – A star-studded gathering of sports media professionals, many of them Syracuse University and Newhouse School alums, joined family and friends on the evening of July 25 to honor Sean McDonough ’84, the ESPN veteran announcer who is about to begin his first season as the play-by-play voice of Monday Night Football as he received that fourth annual Marty Glickman Award for Leadership in Sports Media. Previous winners are Bob Costas and Marv Albert, who sent video message from their posts preparing for the Rio Olympics and Beth Mowins’ who presented the award.

You can view video of the event in the videos portion of this website.

Here are photos of the evening’s event:

By Sam Maller: 

By Cassie Dagostino 

 

 

Babers: “We’re Behind but That’s Okay”

Babers: “We’re Behind but That’s Okay”

Story and photo by Aubrie Tolliver SYRACUSE, NY — It’s been almost eight months since Dino Babers was hired as head coach of the Syracuse football team. Since then, the team has had just 15 practices, all of which occurred in the Spring. Saturday, the team will begin full-squad practices of the fall.  There are just […]

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Story and photo by Aubrie Tolliver

SYRACUSE, NY — It’s been almost eight months since Dino Babers was hired as head coach of the Syracuse football team. Since then, the team has had just 15 practices, all of which occurred in the Spring.

Saturday, the team will begin full-squad practices of the fall.  There are just 28 days left until the season opener against Colgate on Sept. 2, which means the team has just over 40 practices to implement Babers’ entirely different “system,” as he refers to it.

“We know we’re behind but that’s okay,” Babers said in a press conference Friday afternoon at  Manley Field House. “People have been ran down from behind before.”

The System

The system, Babers says, will consist of a hurry-up offense and Tampa 2 defense; a defense which relies on quicker, more agile defensive players.

“Fast pace offense, relentless defense,” redshirt senior Jason Emerich described it. After three seasons under previous head coach Scott Shafer, he and the other veteran players must learn to adopt the entirely different style of play.

“We can never be fast enough and that’s what we’ve come to notice during our first 15 practices this Spring,” Emerich said. “Going into camp, I’m hoping that it sticks to practice 16 and we aren’t starting back over.”

Implementing the Changes

Individually, Babers says with the help of the team’s new athletic performance coach Sean Edinger. the players are stronger and prepared to adopt the system and apply the changes.

“They’ve had a fantastic offseason,” Babers said. “We know the effort is going to be there. It’s just making sure that they’re doing the little things correct so we have the opportunity to do big things during the season.”

In the first week of practice, Babers says he will focus on improving techniques and fundamentals, along with teaching the newer players what is expected of them being part of the team.

“That’s what I’m excited about. To really get the opportunity to know these guys and know exactly what they can do,” Babers said.

Boeheim’s Army: Mission 1 Completed 87-59

Boeheim’s Army: Mission 1 Completed 87-59

Story and photos by Nicole Jones PHILADELPHIA, PA. — Syracuse fans started filling the stands at Philadelphia University early on Saturday evening, anticipating Boeheim’s Army’s first win of the summer. The gym’s air space filled with whispers about the turnout of fans in orange shirts. The fans and players looked locked, loaded and ready to […]

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Story and photos by Nicole Jones

PHILADELPHIA, PA. — Syracuse fans started filling the stands at Philadelphia University early on Saturday evening, anticipating Boeheim’s Army’s first win of the summer. The gym’s air space filled with whispers about the turnout of fans in orange shirts. The fans and players looked locked, loaded and ready to go.

They were. But it would take a while.

Swagger and Honoring Pearl

From the start of warm-ups, Boeheim’s Army established a presence on the court. A presence that gives off a swagger about them like as if the players knew this wouldn’t be their last game in The Basketball Tournament (TBT). Each player competing for the $2-million but also playing in remembrance of the life of the late SU basketball alum Dwayne “Pearl” Washington who died in April. The team took the court with orange warm-up shirts decorated with the name “Pearl” in white script.

With a March Madness-style tournament like this in the middle of the summer, you don’t get to scout your opponent before going into the first couple of games. “It’s more about what we do, not what they do,” coach Ryan Blackwell had said heading into game one. Blackwell was expecting nothing less than a win and that’s exactly what he got as Boeheim’s Army blew open a game that was tight at halftime for an 87-59 win.

Slow start, strong finish

With this team being bigger than last years team, based on Syracuse basketball standards, Boeheim’s Army had a slow start in the first half. Leading by 10 early on did not satisfy the Orange fans. Basketball City NYC wasn’t going to roll over and die either, coming within three of Boeheim’s Army at one point.

Although they never trailed behind their opponent, the fans wanted more. By the time the second half came around more is exactly what they got, Boeheim’s Army playing its game and its game only. Great ball movement, high energy, help side defense across the board, alley-oops and dunks. Boeheim’s Army won the rebound battle 50-32.

The final statistics show that this game was played by a team of unselfish alums and the adopted Purdue point guard Willie Deane who led the team with five assists and ten points. Seven players scored in double digits. Hakim Warrick just missed a double-double with 11 points and nine rebounds. Baye Moussa Keita had 13 and eight and C.J. Fair chipped in 13 and seven.

 

Devendorf speaks

Mic’d up during the game was, Eric Devendorf. He was also the leading scorer with 14 points in 25 minutes of game play. Having stretched the lead to 14, Devendorf told his teammates, “This is where we step on they necks,” The Daily Orange’s Matt Schneidman reported.

 

“I think the first win is the hardest win,” Devendorf said after the game. “It’s a relief to get that over with. Now we can get ready for tomorrow.”

Game two will take place at Philadelphia University against a Philadelphia-based team No. 10 seed 20th & Olney at 4:15pm.

Covering Boeheim’s Army

Covering Boeheim’s Army

Staff report/photos SYRACUSE, N.Y. — A collection of former Syracuse University men’s basketball players heads for Philadelphia this weekend to play in The Basketball Tournament and a chance at a $2 million prize. Six grad students from the Newhouse Sports Media Center –  Nicole Jones, Jake Lapin, Andrew Leffler, Jacquline Mundry, Kelsey Snider and Aubrie […]

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Staff report/photos

SYRACUSE, N.Y. — A collection of former Syracuse University men’s basketball players heads for Philadelphia this weekend to play in The Basketball Tournament and a chance at a $2 million prize.

Six grad students from the Newhouse Sports Media Center –  Nicole Jones, Jake Lapin, Andrew Leffler, Jacquline Mundry, Kelsey Snider and Aubrie Tolliver came to the Melo Center Thursday evening to watch half a dozen of the players scrimmage against current Orange team members to get ready for the tournament and interview them as well as former SU player Ryan Blackwell, who is serving as coach and Newhouse and SU Law grad Kevin Belbey, who is general manager.

Their stories are posted below. Here is a look at some what they saw and the reporters at work.