• History of Excellence

    History of Excellence

    Today’s Syracuse University students pursuing careers in sports media are part of a tradition that goes back more than 70 years. The great sportscaster Marty Glickman ’39 is recognized as the “godfather” of a long line of SU sports media professionals that includes Bob Costas ’74, Hank Greenwald ’57, Dave Pasch ’94, Dick Stockton ’64, Andy Musser ’59, Marv Albert ’63, Len Berman ’68, G’70, Sean McDonough ’84, Mike Tirico ’88, Ian Eagle ’90, Dave O’Brien ’86 and many more–not only in sports broadcasting but also in sports writing, editing, production and management at the national and local levels.

  • Professional Sports Coverage

    Professional Sports Coverage

    Students in the Sports Communications Emphasis have covered the Syracuse Chiefs (AAA baseball) and have written columns focused on Major League Baseball, the National Football League and Mixed Martial Arts. Students also work with the Syracuse Crunch, the Syracuse Stampede Junior “A” Hockey Club and the Silver Knights Professional Indoor Soccer Club. Future coverage will include more writing and reporting as well as commentary on professional sports.

  • SU Sports Coverage

    SU Sports Coverage

    Newhouse School graduate students in the Sports Communications Emphasis serve as credentialed reporters covering Syracuse University teams. Their stories appear on this website in text, photo and video format, and they also contribute to campus media outlets covering sports. Students have covered SU football, cross country, basketball, crew and lacrosse, and there’s more to come.

  • Leading Sports Media Personalities

    Leading Sports Media Personalities

    When you look to the top of the sports broadcasting profession you see Syracuse alumni everywhere you turn: from NBC’s Bob Costas ’74 and Mike Tirico ’88 to Marv Albert ’63, the Voice of the NBA, plus ESPN’s Sean McDonough ’84, Dave Pasch ’94, Dave O’Brien ’86 and Beth Mowins G’90 and CBS’ Ian Eagle ’90. Former SU football and basketball stars such as Daryl Johnston ’89, Don McPherson ’88, Donovan McNabb ’98 and Leo Rautins ’83 have moved into the broadcast booth. SU alums are play-by-play voices for the Boston Red Sox (Dave O’Brien ’86 and Joe Castiglione G’70), San Francisco Giants (Dave Flemming G’99), Minnesota Twins (Cory Provus ’00) and Houston Astros (Robert Ford ’01). Personalities such as Bill Roth ’87 (Virginia Tech), Tony Caridi ’84 (West Virginia) and SU’s own Voice of the Orange Matt Park ’89 call games for Division One college programs.

  • Mentoring Tomorrow’s Pros

    Mentoring Tomorrow’s Pros

    SU alumni in sports media have always been willing to mentor and advise students. Whether returning to campus to speak and meet with the next generation of sports media professionals, Skyping with them, critiquing demo reels and clips or helping students make internship and job contacts, Orange alumni are always there. The Newhouse Sports Media Center helps make those connections between students and alumni.

Quote of the Day

Matt Park

"The best part of recognition like this for Newhouse Sports (STAA #1 ranking) is the reputation of helping one another."

-- Matt Park

Events

2017 Marty Glickman Award to Mike Tirico

Tuesday, November 14

7:00 pm

Joyce Hergenhan Auditorium, Syracuse University

More info

Videos

ESPN’s Sean McDonough ’84 – Voice of Monday Night Football

November 29, 2016

Sean McDonough '84 - Nov. 29, 2016

Sean McDonough '84 - Nov. 29, 2016

ESPN play-by-play commentator Sean McDonough ’84 spoke at the Newhouse School at Syracuse University Nov. 29, 2016, as a guest of the Newhouse Sports Media Center. McDonough, a Newhouse alumnus, was named the voice of ESPN’s “Monday Night Football” in 2016.

Watch Now

Coach Jim Boeheim on Sports Media

September 29, 2016

Newhouse Sports Media Center Hosts Jim Boeheim

Newhouse Sports Media Center Hosts Jim Boeheim

Newhouse Sports Media Center hosts legendary coach Jim Boeheim - Thursday, September 29, 2016

Watch Now

2016 Marty Glickman Award for Leadership in Sports Media

July 25, 2016

2016 Glickman Award Ceremony pt 1

2016 Glickman Award Ceremony pt 1

Greeting & Dean Branham’s Welcome

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2016 Glickman Award Ceremony pt 2

2016 Glickman Award Ceremony pt 2

Introduction & Jason Benetti

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2016 Glickman Award Ceremony pt 9

2016 Glickman Award Ceremony pt 9

Sean McDonough

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Student Reporting

IronPigs Sweep Chiefs with Third Straight One-Run Win

IronPigs Sweep Chiefs with Third Straight One-Run Win

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Story by Jacqueline Mundry

Photos by Aubrie Tolliver

SYRACUSE, N.Y.  — The first and the worst teams in the International League North Division ended their three game series at NBT Bank Stadium on Sunday afternoon in familiar fashion.

After winning the first two games by a run in the ten innings, the Lehigh Valley IronPigs defeated the Syracuse Chiefs 3-2, this time scoring all their runs in the ninth inning.

It was the second largest crowd of the season and while the rain was on and off the 4,213 fans still enjoyed themselves at Bark in the Park Day where animal shelters brought dogs in with the hope of getting them adopted.

The pregame festivities included a successful proposal of marriage by Connor Abdo to Jenna Chrysler.

 

Pitchers Duel

Lehigh Valley’s Ben Lively and Syracuse’s Kyle McGowin both pitched six innings and neither gave up a run.

The game was scoreless through seven and a half innings before the Chiefs got their bats going against Lehigh Valley’s Michael Mariot.

In the bottom of the seventh with two out and no one on base, Brandon Snyder got on with a double to right field. Pedro Severino then singled to drive Snyder home.

Mariot pitched one inning and gave up one run.

 

The Comeback

The number one team in the North Division wasn’t going to go down without a fight, and for the second day in a row the IronPigs made a comeback.

The first batter in the bottom of the ninth, Nick Williams, hit a solo shot tying the game at one.

Syracuse reliever Joe Nathan then walked Cameron Perkins and Taylor Featherston hit a two-run home run to take the 3-1 lead over the Chiefs.

Despite giving up two home runs, Chiefs manager, Billy Gardner said he’s pleased with Nathan’s performance so far this season.

“We’ve been really happy with what he’s been doing,”   Gardner said. “Today’s one of those days that, that happens, and you go out there and you don’t make pitches and guys blow saves.”


A Second Comeback?

In the bottom of the ninth inning, the Chiefs tried to stage a comeback of their own but fell short.

Caleb Ramsey singled and pinch hitter, Clint Robinson hit one to center field to send Ramsey to third base. Ramsey eventually scored off of Irving Falu’s line drive but that was the last run for the Chiefs and the IronPigs completed their three-game sweep as Adrian Sanchez struck out, stranding pinch runner Corban Joseph at third.

Gardner found a silver lining in the sweep.

“We battled, I thought we competed and that’s really all we can ask,” he said. “It’s frustrating a little bit because it kind of takes its toll on you as far as team morale but we were in position last night we were in position today to close it out, we just couldn’t get it done.”

 

Up Next

The Chiefs will hit the road for the next week playing at Charlotte and Gwinnett before returning home on May 30.

 

The IronPigs will head home to face Indianapolis and Louisville.

IronPigs Down Chiefs in Ten Innings Again

IronPigs Down Chiefs in Ten Innings Again

Story and photo by Aubrie Tolliver Syracuse, N.Y. — For the second game in a row, the Syracuse Chiefs and Lehigh Valley IronPigs went into extra innings. And just as in Friday night’s game, the IronPigs scored in the top of the tenth to beat the Chiefs 4-3 Saturday afternoon at NBT Bank Stadium. This time, […]

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Story and photo by Aubrie Tolliver

Syracuse, N.Y. — For the second game in a row, the Syracuse Chiefs and Lehigh Valley IronPigs went into extra innings. And just as in Friday night’s game, the IronPigs scored in the top of the tenth to beat the Chiefs 4-3 Saturday afternoon at NBT Bank Stadium. This time, after they’d scored two in the ninth to send it into the extra frame.

“The thing about their team is that they’re so talented,” Chiefs manager Billy Gardner said. “You make a mistake and you’re going to pay for it.”

Chiefs take early lead

The sun was beaming down on NBT Bank Stadium, flying high behind the home plate for most of the game, which is something the fans–and the team, for that matter–have been waiting for as the second month of the season comes to a close.

The sun, however, created a problem for Lehigh Valley second baseman Pedro Floriman when he lost Rafael Bautista’s high popup in the bottom of the third.

It should have been the final out of the inning.

Instead, the Chiefs plated their first run of the game as Caleb Ramsey scored from second base.

It went in the books as an earned run, since the ball landed a few feet in front of Floriman, who was ducking out of the way, afraid it was going to land on the top of his head.

Lehigh Valley immediately responded in the top of the fourth. The IronPigs had the bases loaded with two out when starting pitcher A.J. Cole missed the base as he took a toss from Clint Robinson on a ground ball to the first baseman, allowing all runners to safely advance and Taylor Featherston to score. The run was unearned.

Irving Falu gave the Chiefs the lead two innings later on a line drive that went just over the outstretched arm of Floriman. Adrian Sanchez expanded the lead the following inning, launching his third homer of the season.

 

The Comeback

Syracuse led 3-1 until the ninth. Manager Billy Gardner then put Rafael Martin in charge of closing out the game, but Martin was unsuccessful in his efforts. J.P. Crawford and Cameron Berkins drove in a run apiece on line drives to center field, tying the game at three.

A scoreless bottom of the inning for the Chiefs gave the IronPigs another opportunity to win it in extra innings and Nick Williams took advantage of it by smashing his fourth homer of the season, this one off Chiefs right-hander Cody Sadderwhite.

Syracuse had two runners on with two out in the bottom of the tenth, but Pedro Beato struck out Brandon Snyder giving the Chiefs their seventh loss in their last eight games.
Notes

  • Andrew Stevenson, who has struggled at the plate since being called up almost two weeks ago, batting .188 in those 13 games, racked up two hits.
  • Sanchez is hitting a team-high .312 on the season and continued to prove be the most consistent hitter for the Chiefs, going 1-3 with the long ball.
  • Lehigh’s starting pitcher Thomas Eshelman went eight innings allowing two earned runs while striking out four. He was also 2-2 at the plate in his first two at bats of the season.
  • The game-time temperature bounced around the upper sixties–a change from Friday night’s game and most of the other games this season where players were having to warm their bats and hands beneath the heaters planted in the dugout.

“Obviously baseball is made for warm weather,” Gardner said in a post-game interview. But, he insisted the weather has not affected the outcomes of the                  previous games, since both teams on the field have to endure the same circumstances.

  • The Chiefs’ pitching staff has a league-worst 5.59 ERA–a full run above the next team average. But, in the past two games, the pitching staff has allowed no more than four runs to the IronPigs–the team with the best record in the division, 28-14.
  • Syracuse possesses the worst division record at 13-25.

 

Coming Up

The Chiefs will look to salvage the final game of the series against Lehigh Valley Sunday afternoon at NBT Bank Stadium. First pitch is set, once again, for 1:05 p.m.

 

IronPigs Take the Bacon

IronPigs Take the Bacon

Story and photos by Aubrie Tolliver Syracuse, N.Y. — What amounted to a swinging bunt in the top of the tenth inning made the difference as the Lehigh Valley IronPigs topped the Syracuse Chiefs 3-2 in extra innings Friday night at NBT Bank Stadium. On another chilly night (57 degrees at first pitch) that had fans […]

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Story and photos by Aubrie Tolliver

Syracuse, N.Y. — What amounted to a swinging bunt in the top of the tenth inning made the difference as the Lehigh Valley IronPigs topped the Syracuse Chiefs 3-2 in extra innings Friday night at NBT Bank Stadium.

On another chilly night (57 degrees at first pitch) that had fans and players bundled up, the Chiefs had ten hits in the game but only managed to turn any of them into runs in the fifth inning.

Newcomer Andrew Stevenson singled on a ground ball up the middle, which plated Grant Green. Clint Robinson earned the only other RBI with a ground ball to right field two batters later.

The Lehigh Valley hitters, sporting their iconic “Bacon USA” jerseys, countered the following inning, also plating two runs. In the top of the sixth, the Chiefs starting hurler Austin Voth, who tossed four hitless innings to begin the game, found himself in a bases-loaded, no-outs situation after three consecutive singles. A fielder’s choice off the bat of Rhys Hoskins plated the first run and a Nick Williams infield single brought home the second.

It remained a 2-2 tie after nine innings. But, the IronPigs needed just one more inning to seal the victory.

Big hit + little hit = winning run

In the top of the tenth, Lehigh Valley’s Hector Gomez pulled an inside pitch down the right field line. By the time the defense got it back into the infield, he was standing third base with his first triple of the year. The Chiefs’ right-hander Mike Broadway went on to strike out the next two batters and seemed on the verge of doing the same to batter number four.

But on the 0-2 pitch, Jorge Alfaro swung and barely got a piece of the ball. It was hit slowly down the third base side in a spot where no infielder could get to it and went in the books as an RBI single–the winning RBI single as Gomez scored.

Up 3-2 in the last half of the tenth, closer Pedro Beato shut the door on the Chiefs’ offense, recording his 12th save of the season. Pat Venditte earned his fourth win while Broadway was tagged with his first loss.

Next

The IronPigs now stand at 27-14 on the season while the Chiefs fall to a division-worst 13-24.

The teams will play game two of the three-game series Saturday at NBT Bank with first pitch scheduled for 1:05 p.m.

Orange Men Down Yale by What Else? One.

Orange Men Down Yale by What Else? One.

Photos by Dontae Harris SYRACUSE, N.Y. — The Bulldogs came out barking Sunday night at the Carrier Dome and almost managed to take a big bite out of the No.2 Syracuse Orange men. But with a strong second half and a stalwart stint by Evan Molloy in the goal, Syracuse came back to hold off Yale […]

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Photos by Dontae Harris

SYRACUSE, N.Y. — The Bulldogs came out barking Sunday night at the Carrier Dome and almost managed to take a big bite out of the No.2 Syracuse Orange men. But with a strong second half and a stalwart stint by Evan Molloy in the goal, Syracuse came back to hold off Yale 11-10 and advance in the NCAA men’s Lacrosse Tournament.

Syracuse won its ninth one-goal game of the year and will face Towson in Newark, Del. in the quarter finals next weekend.
“I guess it’s practice,” SU head coach John Desko said when asked how his team wins so many tight games.” Practice makes perfect, right?”

Grrrr

Showing they were not about to be intimidated, the unranked Ivy League champions, also known as the Eli, bounded onto the field with a brashness that irked some of the Orange players and led to some up close and personal conversations, although nothing physical. That would wait for the game.

The Orange scored first on a Brendan Bomberry shot just 1:17 in. The Eli tied it on a Matt Gaudet goal with 9:36 left in the quarter and then went up 2-1 on Joseph Sessa’s score.

Freshman Jamie Trimboli answered for the Orange but Lucas Cotler got Yale the lead back and it looked as if it would hold it to the end of the quarter. But Sergio Salcido fired in a buzzer beater from distance to tie it at 3.

What was remarkable about the tie was that Yale outshot Syracuse 20-5 in the quarter and took all but one faceoff. The Eli wound up taking 42 shots in the game to the Orange’s 29.

 

Reeves shines

Syracuse took its first lead on a Nick Mariano shot that left him sprawling from a defensive hit. Mariano got in the defender’s face and instead of grabbing momentum, the Orange found itself a man down with an unsportsmanlike conduct penalty.

“I let my emotions get out of hand a little bit and Coach Desko let me hear about it,” Mariano said. “I learned my lesson and that’s it.”

Yale’s Tewaaraton Trophy finalist Ben Reeves then asserted himself as the Eli went on a 3-0 run. Reeves sandwiched two goals around Cotler’s second, including a point-blanker with eight seconds left in the half. Reeves had two goals and two assists in the half.

“He’s their motor and he’s a great one,” Desko said.

Molloy was stellar in goal with nine saves for the Orange but couldn’t completely stop the Yale barrage and Yale had a 6-4 lead at the half.

Syracuse struggled for possessions as faceoff man Ben Williams managed just one out of 11 in the half against Yale’s Conor Mackie.

 

Orange comes alive

Yale extended the lead to 7-4 barely a minute into the third quarter with a Jackson Morrill goal, but the Orange then came to life, going on a 5-1 run for the rest of the quarter to take a 9-8 lead with 15 minutes left.

First Nate Solomon closed the lead to two and then Brad Voigt put one in with the Orange a man up. Gaudet got his second for Yale, but Mariano, Jordan Evans and Trimboli scores gave the Orange the lead.

Desko substituted Dan Varello for Williams at the X but without a lot more success, as he took 3 of 10 faceoffs. Mackie wound up with 18 of 22.

 

Molloy is the man

After Molloy stopped Morrill’s would-be tying shot with his 13th save, Ryan Simmons gave SU a two-goal lead at 10-8 and the Orange seemed to have momentum with under ten minutes to go in the fourth quarter.

Or not.

Yale came up with the ball after a lengthy scrum off the faceoff and the 6’ 3” Reeves took over with a snipe from up top, over the head of Scott Firman and past Molloy, cutting the Syracuse lead back to one at 7:12.

Barely a minute later, Reeves did it again with his 42nd goal of the season, bulling past Firman and blasting it home for the tie. There was 6:01 left in regulation.

His fourth goal of the night made it 10-10.

“Scotty played great on Ben Reeves and he’s just a great shooter,” Molloy said. “Honestly, I’ll take the blame for probably all those.”

And again Yale controlled the faceoff.

But a Molloy save on a shot by Mackie gave Syracuse the ball back.

After a timeout by Syracuse at 3:12, Yale’s Phil Huffard saved a Trimboli shot to maintain the tie. But the Orange got it back and Stephen Rephus scored on a perfect feed from Evans behind the cage with 2:09 and the Orange led 11-10.

“I think there was a miscommunication on defense and they kind of both went to him just one step, and then Jordan found me,” Rephus said.

Mackie took the draw for Yale. Again.

The Bulldogs attacked but Firman at last got the best of Reeves, knocking the ball out of his stick. As Yale tried to shovel it home, the ball came loose in a pileup in front of the cage and Molloy dug it out.

Desko took a timeout with :25.5 to go.

The Orange moved it around, running out the clock and with three seconds left, Mariano fired it up in the air. It came down in Yale goalie Huffard’s stick in time for him to heave it the length of the field.

And.

Molloy stopped it again.

OK, it was off-target to the left of the goal, but Molloy made sure there’d be no crazy bounce to keep the Eli alive.

“Defensively, we were giving up shots I could see,” Molloy said. “I think the difference was I was seeing the ball well inside. Really it was just a great team defensive effort.”

The redshirt senior from Long Island made 15 saves on the night.

“He played great,” Desk understated in a postgame interview with ESPN. “Evan came up big for us.”

Bisons Rout Chiefs, 9-3 in Series Opener

Bisons Rout Chiefs, 9-3 in Series Opener

Story By Robert Schiff Photos By Aubrie Tolliver SYRACUSE, N.Y. – After a stretch that saw the Chiefs drop their last four games,scoring only six runs, Syracuse returned home for a three-game set on Monday against the Buffalo Bisons hoping for better results. Instead on a night so cold that fans, players and umpires were bundled […]

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Story By Robert Schiff

Photos By Aubrie Tolliver

SYRACUSE, N.Y. – After a stretch that saw the Chiefs drop their last four games,scoring only six runs, Syracuse returned home for a three-game set on Monday against the Buffalo Bisons hoping for better results. Instead on a night so cold that fans, players and umpires were bundled up, the Chiefs lost their fifth in a row.

Despite a hot start for the home team, it was all Buffalo the rest of the way, as the Bisons defeated the Chiefs, 9-3, to take the series opener at NBT Bank Stadium. The the Chiefs (9-17), who now find themselves in last place, seven games behind Buffalo (17-11) in the International League North.

 

 

Out of Nowhere

With the recent departure of catcher Mike Ohlman, who was called up by the Blue Jays,  Buffalo promoted Raffy Lopez from Double-A New Hampshire on Sunday, and the move paid dividends for the Bisons immediately.

Making just his second start of the season, Lopez made the most of his opportunity. With one on, and his team trailing by one in the top of the second inning, the newly promoted catcher crushed a two-run shot to right center field, putting Buffalo on top, 2-1.

In his next at-bat, this time with two runners on in the fifth, Lopez hit a towering fly ball that cleared the right field wall by more than 50 feet. His second home run of the game gave the Bisons a 5-1 lead after four innings of play. The 29 year-old catcher finished with five RBI on the night, going 2-for-4.

Buffalo tacked on two more runs in the fifth, extending its lead to six, and then two more in the ninth to complete the scoring.
Team Effort

About an hour before first pitch, Buffalo’s starting pitcher Casey Lawrence was scratched after being designated for assignment and relief pitcher

Murphy Smith took over as a last-minute replacement.

Smith found himself in some trouble in the first, but limited the damage to only one run, as he got both Clint Robinson and Pedro Severino to fly out with two runners in scoring position. Smith then retired the side in order in the second inning.

With two outs in the third, Smith found himself in another jam after giving up back-to-back hits to Matt Skole and Brandon Snyder, but again battled through, and got Robinson to pop up to the catcher, ending the threat for the Chiefs.

It was Robinson’s second-straight at-bat stranding two runners in scoring position. Leonel Campos took over and pitched the next two innings, giving up just one hit to collect his first win of the season.

Chad Girodo tossed four quality innings for the Bisons – his longest outing of the season – giving up four hits and two runs, and striking out four.

 

 Signs of Life

After going just 5-for-34 in his last nine games, Chiefs left fielder Brandon Snyder had a breakout night, going 3-for-4, and driving in three runs. Snyder crushed his sixth homer of the season over the right field wall in the bottom of the 8th, cutting the Bisons’ lead to four at the time.

After getting roughed up in his last two appearances, longtime MLB closer Joe Nathan looked impressive for Syracuse, retiring the Bisons in order in the 8th inning.

 

What Lies Ahead

It’ll be a quick turnaround for the Chiefs, as they continue their three-game series with Buffalo at 1:05 p.m. on Tuesday afternoon. Austin Voth (1-3, 5.63) will be on the hill for Syracuse, taking on Jarrett Grube (2-2, 4.68).

 

 

Chiefs’ Snyder: “Time for Us to Man Up”

Chiefs’ Snyder: “Time for Us to Man Up”

Story by Lauren Walsh Photos by Aubrie Tolliver SYRACUSE, N.Y. – On a frigid night at NBT Bank Stadium that saw the Syracuse Chiefs’ lose their fifth straight game, this one to the Buffalo Bisons, 9-3, the Chiefs Brandon Snyder had a hot bat. He went 3-4 with two doubles and a two-run home run. Snyder is […]

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Story by Lauren Walsh

Photos by Aubrie Tolliver

SYRACUSE, N.Y. – On a frigid night at NBT Bank Stadium that saw the Syracuse Chiefs’ lose their fifth straight game, this one to the Buffalo Bisons, 9-3, the Chiefs Brandon Snyder had a hot bat. He went 3-4 with two doubles and a two-run home run.

Snyder is batting .224 with five home runs and 18 RBIs this season. He says the team’s recent losses sparked a change in his approach at the plate.

“I think it’s more of a mindset because I’m just tired of not competing and being the player that I know I am,” Snyder said. “The last couple weeks we’ve been struggling and today I was like, ‘I’m just gonna go back to trying to compete,’ and that was it.”

 

Slugging Snyder

The first baseman put the Chiefs on the board in the first with a double to center field that drove in Andrew Stevenson. That turned out to be the only Chiefs’ lead. Catcher Raffy Lopez hit a two-run shot to right field in the top of the second inning, giving Buffalo the 2-1 lead and the Bisons rolled from there.

Snyder hit a double to right in the bottom of the third, advancing Matt Skole to third. But they were left on base after the inning ended with a Clint Robinson pop-up to second.

In the eighth inning, with the Chefs behind 7-1, Snyder came up with a big swing for a two-run bomb into right field. The Las Vegas, Nev. native knocked in all three of Syracuse’s runs.

His late-game heroics weren’t nearly enough to close the gap. Buffalo scored two more runs on a throwing error in the ninth inning, sealing the 9-3 win.

 

New Mindset

 The Chiefs are 2-10 in the past two weeks, including Monday night’s game and after being rained out at Scranton/Wilkes-Barre on Sunday, Snyder said the team got together and chatted about changing some tactical elements of their play to turn some of those L’s to W’s on the score sheet.

 

“I think that leaving Scranton it was kind of a team thing… This is triple-A baseball and to a man, to myself, it was looking in the mirror and saying, ‘Hey, stop being the guy that just goes out there and tries to figure it out.’ If you haven’t figured it out by now, you might as well go home.”

Personally, Snyder had a few adjustments of his own that he kept in mind throughout the game.

“I went up there and in the same process of just trying to compete, not swinging at bad pitches, trying to work good counts and just going up there and trying to put together a good at bat,” he said.

 

No Stopping Buffalo

While Snyder had a good night at the plate, Syracuse gave up nine runs and 13 hits against Buffalo. The Chiefs only made one error, but there wasn’t much the team could do to stop the Bisons’ bats according to Snyder.

“We had a couple balls that guys think we could’ve made plays on, but for the most part they went out there and swung the bat well, they got good pitches to hit, worked the count, and it just kind of is what it is.”

He said to start winning the team as a whole needs to adjust its mindset for each game.

“It’s about going out there and changing the mindset and I’m tired of [losing]. Just need to go out there and try to compete,” Snyder said.

The six-foot-two first baseman was blunt in his thoughts on the rest of the season.

“I think it’s time for us to just man up and play baseball.”

Orange Men Survive at Colgate

Orange Men Survive at Colgate

Story, photo and video by Lauren Walsh HAMILTON, N.Y. – Time was ticking down in the fourth quarter, Syracuse led 10-9, and it looked like the Orange was about to record its eleventh one-goal game of the season. After Colgate turned the ball over, missing its last chance to tie with six seconds left, SU […]

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Story, photo and video by Lauren Walsh

HAMILTON, N.Y. – Time was ticking down in the fourth quarter, Syracuse led 10-9, and it looked like the Orange was about to record its eleventh one-goal game of the season.

After Colgate turned the ball over, missing its last chance to tie with six seconds left, SU goalie Evan Molloy launched the ball down the field to celebrate the win.

Molloy’s heave sailed into the empty Colgate net, giving him his first career goal and Syracuse  an 11-9 win over the Raiders.

The Orange (12-2, 4-0 ACC) closed out the regular season with an 8-1 record against non-conference opponents. The win over Colgate (5-9, 3-5 Patriot League) was the fifth in a row for Syracuse, but a game few had expected to come down to the final seconds.

“We still want to get that full 60-minute effort, SU head coach John Desko told CBS Sports after the game. “We made some bad decisions.”

Close Games

Out of ten one-goal games, the Orange has won eight. The “Cardiac ‘Cuse” has been in close games all season, and head coach John Desko said his team is well-prepared to finish down the stretch in those close situations.

“The fact that we’ve been in so many this year, we really notice a difference in the huddle from our first game to our last game,” Desko said. “The guys are pretty confident and they’re kind of all ears and you can tell by what they’re saying that if they play the way they’re playing, they’re confident they can win.”

Syracuse jumped out to a 3-0 lead in the first quarter, but Colgate evened the score by the end of the period. SU and Colgate took turns scoring in bulk. The Orange scored three goals to start the second frame, and Colgate responded by scoring four consecutive goals to take the 7-6 lead.

Then, SU scored twice, taking the 8-7 lead heading into the fourth quarter. Jordan Evans netted a goal in the fourth as did Pat Carlin, his second of the season.

Sam Cleveland sniped a goal past Molloy with 1:30 to play for his twenty-second goal of the season and his fourth in the contest.

Sloppy Offense and Defense

The Orange turned the ball over a season-high 17 times against the Raiders. On the other side of the stat sheet, Colgate turned the ball over just 11 times.

“I think some of it was some of our players trying to make things happen in a close game and I think they forced it a few times,” Desko said.

Molloy added that the amount of turnovers was a result of mental errors from Syracuse. He said some players were beating themselves up and making mental errors as a result.

With all those turnovers and plenty of physical hits, there were many opportunities for groundballs, 57, in fact. Syracuse scooped up 33, and Molloy saw that as an important positive in the game.

“Groundballs are huge,” Molloy said. “Towards the end of the year we’ve really been stressing the importance of groundballs, really getting every single one, and that’s been our mindset.”

Bomberry For Three

Junior midfielder Brendan Bomberry hasn’t flinched in Syracuse’s one-goal contests. The Osweken, Ontario native scored the game-winning goal in the 9-8 win over St. John’s and the 8-7 win over Johns Hopkins earlier this season.

Against Colgate, Bomberry had three goals and one assist. He now has five hat tricks and 26 goals this season.

“Every possession is valuable at that point in an important game, especially in a one-goal game,” Bomberry said. “Just try to make sure you don’t turn the ball over or giving the team another break. You know, just trying to get the goal, put the ball in the net, and hopefully we can come away with a win.”

Bomberry’s 35 points on the season land him fourth on the team in points.

“He’s really nifty, if you will, at finding space inside. He’s really good in that area. I think he could’ve had a couple more and the goalie robbed him a few times,” Desko said on the junior sharpshooter.

Looking Ahead

The NCAA Tournament Championship will be held at Gillette Stadium in Foxborough, M.A. May 27-29. Syracuse finds out its opponent for the first round of the NCAA tournament at 9 p.m. on Sunday in ESPNU’s Tournament Seeding Show and is sure to open with a home game at the Carrier Dome.

When asked if he wanted to be the #1 seed, Desko said, “It depends on who they’re gonna put in at 16.”

He said he thinks Syracuse will be seeded high and that will help the Orange in the tournament. Desko said there are no easy games in the playoffs, so the Orange will come to play every game.

The Creator’s Game

The Creator’s Game

Story, photos and videos by Jon Cerio   SYRACUSE, N.Y. – Central New York has been known as a hotbed for collegiate lacrosse for decades.  Three local colleges – Syracuse University, Le Moyne College, and Onondaga Community College – have dominated the lacrosse landscape in the area and often in the nation. Syracuse University has won […]

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Story, photos and videos by Jon Cerio

 

SYRACUSE, N.Y. – Central New York has been known as a hotbed for collegiate lacrosse for decades.  Three local colleges – Syracuse University, Le Moyne College, and Onondaga Community College – have dominated the lacrosse landscape in the area and often in the nation.

Syracuse University has won 11 Division I national championships in men’s lacrosse – five since 2000.  In Division II, Le Moyne College has won five national titles since 2004.  Perhaps most impressive of all, Onondaga Community College has won nine national championships in the past eleven years.

 

Creating a Legacy

It can’t be coincidence that three schools in the Syracuse area have all had this level success.

In fact, it’s not.

These colleges are located in the heart of what was once Haudenosaunee Confederacy land.  In fact, the confederacy – made up of the Onondaga, Mohawk, Oneida, Cayuga and Seneca, and later the Tuscarora nations – was formed at what is now known as Onondaga Lake.

The game of lacrosse was created by the indigenous people.  But if you ask them, they’ll tell you it came from someone else.

“To the Haudenosaunee, they call lacrosse the Creator’s game, given to replace warfare,”Onondaga Nation attorney Joe Heath says.

“War doesn’t please the Creator,” Onondaga Historical Association Director Gregg Tripoli says.  “If they really wanted to please the Creator, they would play this game called ‘Deyhontsigwa’ehs,’ and that translated means ‘they bump hips.’  But we know that game today as lacrosse.”

Tradition

John Buck is an Onondaga Nation elder, and played lacrosse in his youth for several organizations.  He’s still an avid fan of the game, and is sure to attend every Onondaga Redhawks lacrosse game on the Nation’s land in Nedrow.  The Redhawks play what is known as box, or indoor lacrosse.

“The game was to settle differences basically,” Buck says from his seat in the stands.  “Of course, the game wasn’t this small that time.  It was miles apart between goals.  Because the nations, instead of battling among themselves, they played the game.”

The game is a tradition that has remained a key part of Native American culture.

“It’s part of our legacy,” Buck explains.

 

Sticking with Success

Local colleges have taken notice.  Syracuse, Le Moyne, and OCC all have native players on their squads each year.

“We’ve had so many players over the years,” Syracuse men’s lacrosse head coach John Desko says.

“It’s been part of the culture here.”

“Every year we have eight-to-ten Native American kids on our team,” OCC men’s lacrosse head coach Chuck Wilbur says.  “With so many on our team, the traditions they played with, their styles, get passed onto our team.  I think our guys love it, learning the culture and where the game comes from.”

 

Crossing Borders

“I grew up playing lacrosse all my life, ever since the age of two,” Sakohawi Kirby says.  Kirby is a sophomore on OCC’s team, from the native land Kahnawake, near Montreal.

“It’s been a large part of my culture. It’s originally named the medicine game.  Play it in front of all our people, and it gives back a medicine to our people, everybody watching.”

“Everyone plays from five years old to older men,” OCC men’s lacrosse player Russ Oakes says.  The freshman came to Onondaga Community College from the Mohawk Nation at Akwesasne, which straddles the border between New York and Ontario and Quebec on the St. Lawrence River.,

“Ever since I was little I’ve always had a lacrosse stick in my hand,”  Syracuse sophomore defenseman Tyson Bomberry says.  “Whenever we were going to go visit family that’s what you brought with you.”

 

Center Stage

Players such as Bomberry often come from Canada to Central New York to play lacrosse because of the region’s native history and quality athletic programs.  Others have ties to the area.

“For me, always growing up here, my aunts on the Onondaga reservation, I’ve always felt like here has been like home,” says Syracuse junior midfielder Brendan Bomberry, who is Tyson’s cousin and transferred to SU after starting his college career at Denver.

“Being a part of the tradition of the Onondagas, the center nation of the Iroquois, playing here with the Onondaga on your chest, being a part of that rich history, that all of us grew up with as Native Americans.”

“It’s just something in their blood. It just comes natural for some reason,” Buck says.  “As soon as a boy is born, automatically you give him a lacrosse stick.”

 

Plenty of Practice

Erica Shenandoah is an Onondaga Nation resident, and was also at the Redhawks game, just down the bench from Buck.  She too is well aware of the importance of the sport in her culture.

“I know other lacrosse players probably have the same amount of experience, and are just as good,” Shenandoah says.  “But these guys were raised here since they were little toddlers, kind of running around and playing, so…it’s a constant practice.”

“I think they’re born with a stick in their crib literally,” Wilbur adds.  “And when they play, their stick is almost like a third arm to them.  You just see the fluidity and just how easy the game comes to them.  Their skill level is just incredible.”

That skill and constant practice have helped mold many championship teams at the collegiate level in the Syracuse area.

 

Thanksgiving

“The game of lacrosse is one of the biggest gifts that our people gave to this country,” Buck says.

“I’m trying to be a role model for our younger Native American kids,” Tyson Bomberry says.  “They can come to school and get an education through using their lacrosse abilities.”

“We have all benefited from it, certainly Central New York,” Heath says.  “Le Moyne, OCC, SU, always are in the top five.”

It’s a sentiment that OCC’s head coach wholeheartedly endorses.

“One hundred percent yeah, we are in the hotbed of lacrosse.  And the Onondaga Nation and the Native Americans started it,” Wilbur says.  “Our success as a program is a huge part because of them.  Not just on the field, but the tradition that’s been passed on to us from centuries.”

Going Forward

Going Forward

Story, photos and videos by Bridget Chavez. SYRACUSE, N.Y. — Every day people are recovering at the Upstate Rehabilitation Institute for Human Performance. The circular room looks like a typical indoor gym, with a small auburn track running around weight lifting and cardio machines and a few patients working out. To one side of the gym […]

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Story, photos and videos by Bridget Chavez.

SYRACUSE, N.Y. — Every day people are recovering at the Upstate Rehabilitation Institute for Human Performance. The circular room looks like a typical indoor gym, with a small auburn track running around weight lifting and cardio machines and a few patients working out. To one side of the gym is an open area with chairs lined up in rows.

Trainer and graduating Syracuse University student, Isaiah Johnson strolls into the room, towering high above everyone around him at 6’5″ and 270 pounds.

“Alright everyone let’s get started,” he announces.

There are about half a dozen people in the class and they follow Johnson as he leads them through warm up stretches. Although the athletic 23-year-old is half the age of most in the class, they pay close attention and follow his direction to a T.

Once stretching and warm ups are complete, the patients disperse to their individual workouts, with some starting with the ellipticals and the treadmills while others begin with weight lifting. Johnson works with this same group three times per week, and while he helps them recover from injuries and reach physical goals, Johnson is recovering himself.


April 9, 2015

“April 9, 2015 will always be a date in my head because for me that was the day that ended everything for me,” Johnson remembers. The former defensive lineman suffered multiple concussions over the course of 18-months and it was on that day team doctors told Johnson he was medically disqualified from playing the game he loved so much.

“Now that was a stab in the heart,” Johnson says, “Taking away something from somebody that you love because of an illness that you have, basically. That’s what a concussion is to me is an illness.”

He got his first concussion after sacking Florida State quarterback, Jameis Winston and the second and third were sustained during spring practices. Johnson says he thought he just had a headache, but really it was a third concussion.

“I was just trying to cope with it. I thought I just had a headache but I don’t remember anything after that practice.”

And just a few days later his football career was over.

“I didn’t even care that I had concussions,” he says, “Until they told me I couldn’t play no more.” Johnson says he deals with the side effects of multiple concussions every day. He’s sensitive to light and loud noises.

Finding his Niche

“Taking away athletics from me made me become a student first,” he says. Johnson also says he never had any aspirations to try to go pro and says not having football has made him become more mature.

“I want everyone to feel comfortable when they’re around me,” Johnson says walking around to check on each. He looks at their charts and goals and discusses where they are and what they are trying to achieve.

Johnson graduates this spring with a bachelor’s degree in public health and hopes to continue forward in the field by getting a master’s degree. Working with patients at the institute is in his realm of expertise and interest. He says after graduation he is heading home to Delaware to spend time with his family and will begin graduate school in the fall.

 

Skole Gets Gold Glove, Chiefs Get Rained Out

Skole Gets Gold Glove, Chiefs Get Rained Out

Story and photo by Lauren Walsh SYRACUSE, N.Y. – Chalk up another rain-out for the Syracuse Chiefs. The Pawtucket Red Sox were scheduled to take on the Chiefs for game three of the series on Thursday evening at NBT Bank Stadium, but the weather had other plans. By the 6:35 p.m. start time, the field was […]

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Story and photo by Lauren Walsh

SYRACUSE, N.Y. – Chalk up another rain-out for the Syracuse Chiefs. The Pawtucket Red Sox were scheduled to take on the Chiefs for game three of the series on Thursday evening at NBT Bank Stadium, but the weather had other plans.

By the 6:35 p.m. start time, the field was soaked and not a single player had warmed up. The game was officially called off for Syracuse’s sixth rain-out of the season. The teams are scheduled to make up the game as part of a doubleheader on Tuesday, June 13th at 5:05 p.m.

Syracuse holds a 9-14 record, putting the Chiefs at the bottom of the International League North, Pawtucket is one spot above Syracuse in fifth place with a 12-12 record.

Skole honored

A bright spot for the Chiefs came despite the cloudy, rainy skies. Syracuse first baseman Matt Skole was presented with the Gold Glove Award for the 2016 season.

Skole put up a .990 fielding percentage in 974 chances. He made just one error in the field last season. The Woodstock, Ga. native is the third Washington Nationals organization player to win the award since 2005.

The Chiefs are on a two-game losing streak, both to Pawtucket and have lost seven of their last eight. Syracuse hits the road for a three-game series against the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre RailRiders. First pitch of the series is Friday at 6:35 p.m.

Stranded: Chiefs Leave 14 on Base, Lose 7-0 to PawSox

Stranded: Chiefs Leave 14 on Base, Lose 7-0 to PawSox

Story and photos by Aubrie Tolliver Syracuse, N.Y. — Just as Syracuse Chiefs’ starting pitcher Taylor Hill set on the mound ready to take his first pitch, the sun made its first appearance at NBT Bank Stadium, peeking through a hole in the gray clouds. But three pitches later, it went back into hiding. Coincidentally, that happened […]

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Story and photos by Aubrie Tolliver

Syracuse, N.Y. — Just as Syracuse Chiefs’ starting pitcher Taylor Hill set on the mound ready to take his first pitch, the sun made its first appearance at NBT Bank Stadium, peeking through a hole in the gray clouds.

But three pitches later, it went back into hiding. Coincidentally, that happened just as leadoff hitter Aneury Tavarez smashed his first home run of the season over the left field fence—a reoccurring theme in Wednesday afternoon’s game between the Chiefs and Pawtucket Red Sox.

The sun eventually came for good but the game remained gray for the Chiefs, as they were defeated by the PawSox 7-0.

 

Early Runs

Three batters after Tavarez’s leadoff homer, the Sox scored another run on a single up the middle by Sam Travis. Two runs were on the board before Hill retired the side.

He got through the next two innings unscathed. But, after a Travis infield single led off the fourth, Steve Selsky took the first pitch over the right field fence. It was 4-0 PawSox after four.

Tavarez followed suit the next inning with his second blast of the game. Two batters later, Rusney Castillo did the same.

Syracuse had its greatest opportunity to score in the bottom of the eighth when the Chiefs managed to get the bases loaded with just one out. But, a strikeout and groundout later, the threat was demolished.

A 1-2-3 ninth inning sealed the deal. Pawtucket beat Syracuse 7-0.

 

Starting Pitchers: Night and Day

“Starting pitchers set the tone,” manager Billy Gardner said in a post-game interview. “We just didn’t have it today.”

Both starting pitchers went five innings. Hill, however, allowed six earned runs. Among the nine hits he gave up to Pawtucket batters, four were homers.

Owens, on the other hand, blanked the Chiefs’ offense in his five innings of work, allowing just one hit.

 

Missed Opportunities

The Chiefs didn’t have a hard time getting runners on base—ten batters reached by way of a walk through the nine innings. But, the offense left 14 runners on base, nine of them in scoring position.

 

A Rollercoaster Season—Just 23 Games In

After starting off the season with just two wins in
their first nine games, the Chiefs went on to win their next six straight and was able to get above .500 during that winning streak.

But, that all ended on March 23.

Since then, the team switched back to its losing ways and is just 1-8.  The Chiefs now sport a season record of 9-14—the worst in the International League. The Red Sox’s 12-12 record lands them in the spot just above.

 

Onward

Both the Chiefs and the Red Sox return to the NBT Bank Stadium Thursday to close out the three-game series. The Sox will be looking for the sweep. First pitch is scheduled for 6:35 p.m.

“We’ve got to get a few of our guys that we thought would hit to start cooking a little bit,” Gardner said. “Once we do that we’ll start stringing more competitive at bats together and start putting pressure on them.”

PawSox Take Opener Over Chiefs

PawSox Take Opener Over Chiefs

Story by Robert Schiff Photos by Aubrie Tolliver SYRACUSE, N.Y. – After salvaging the final game of a six-game road trip with a win against Norfolk on Sunday, the Chiefs found themselves back in the loss column, dropping the series opener against the Pawtucket Red Sox, 3-1, at NBT Bank Stadium on Tuesday night. Shut […]

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Story by Robert Schiff

Photos by Aubrie Tolliver

SYRACUSE, N.Y. – After salvaging the final game of a six-game road trip with a win against Norfolk on Sunday, the Chiefs found themselves back in the loss column, dropping the series opener against the Pawtucket Red Sox, 3-1, at NBT Bank Stadium on Tuesday night.

Shut Down

On a chilly night (52 degrees and 15mph wind at the first pitch) that had spectators and players bundled up, the Chiefs (9-13) could not find an answer for Red Sox starter Brian Johnson. After giving up a leadoff single in the 1st inning, the 26 year-old lefty retired 13 straight batters, before Chiefs’ catcher Pedro Severino drew a one-out walk in the bottom of the 5th inning.

Johnson didn’t allow another hit until the bottom of the 8th, when Chiefs’ second baseman Grant Green fought off a tough pitch and blooped a single into short right field. In his most impressive start of the season, Johnson lasted eight innings, giving up only two hits and striking out six, while earning his first victory of the year.

Pitchers’ Duel

While Brian Johnson’s performance was the talk of the night, Chiefs’ starter Austin Voth pitched well for Syracuse, tossing a season-high seven innings. His first mistake came against Red Sox left fielder Steve Selsky, who crushed his first home run of the season over the left field fence.

Voth struck out the side in order in the third, but ran into more trouble in the 5th. After giving up a double to Jantzen Witte, and a walk to catcher Dan Butler, right fielder Aneury Tavarez smacked an RBI double down the third base line. The next batter, Deven Marrero blooped a single into shallow center field, just out of reach of a diving Andrew Stevenson, as Pawtucket extended its lead to 3-0.

One and Done

The Chiefs finally got on the board in the bottom of the 8th. After the designated hitter Corban Joseph drew a one-out walk, Grant Green singled, moving Joseph to third. He eventually scored on a s sac fly by  the shortstop Adrian Sanchez.

The Chiefs got the tying run to the plate in the 9th after left fielder Brandon Snyder drew a two-out walk, but third baseman Matt Skole’s weak fly ball to center field ended the short-lived rally, and the game for Syracuse.

Bright Spot 

In his first game at the Triple-A level, the newest Chief made his presence felt immediately. Andrew Stevenson led the game off for Syracuse with a line drive single, much to the delight of the fans, who were excited to see the Nationals’ fifth-ranked prospect in action. Stevenson sported a .350 average in 80 at-bats with Double-A Harrisburg, and had back-to-back five-hit games a couple of weeks ago.

“It’s always kind of a dream to just keep moving, and try to get to the big leagues,” Stevenson said. “I’m one step closer, and I’m just going to keep working to try to get that ultimate goal.”

Looking Ahead

The Chiefs have now lost six out of their last seven games, and find themselves in last place in the International League North, five games behind the Buffalo Bisons. The Chiefs continue their series with Pawtucket on Wednesday at 1:05 p.m.